Molly Nebiolo, a PhD candidate in the Department of History at Northeastern University, received the Outstanding Graduate Student Award for Humanics this year. Nebiolo’s research focuses on the history of health and wellness in early colonial American cities. The Award recognizes one graduate student per year who excels at humanics, a term coined by Northeastern President Joseph Aoun to describe the blend of technical proficiency, data literacy, and experiential learning. Nebiolo collaborated with Christopher Parsons, a Professor of History at Northeastern, and Matthew Bowser, a recent graduate of the History PhD program, on a digital project called The Birth of Boston. This project used GIS and other methods to layer a map of Boston’s land parcels in 1648 with details about the city’s earliest inhabitants.

Molly Nebiolo was a Research Fellow for the Digital Integration Teaching Initiative in 2019, and received a NULab seedling grant to attend the Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria in June 2018. She was also a project manager for the Women Writers Vector Toolkit, hosted by Northeastern’s Women Writers Project for which Nebiolo was also a text encoder.

Northeastern’s Office of the Provost noted that “Molly’s current research—a 3D modeling and mapping project that looks at the spatial history of health in colonial American cities—is an exemplar for how digital and humanistic literacies can enrich our understanding of America’s past.” The award’s announcement can be found here.