Contesting Misogynoir: Black Women’s Digital Resistance in American Culture
Dr. Moya Bailey

Contesting Misogynoir: Black Women’s Digital Resistance in American Culture examines Black women’s critical responses to anti-Black misogyny in American media that is propelled via digital platforms. I first created the portmanteau misogynoir to name the specific combination of anti-Black and misogynistic representation in visual culture and digital spaces that shapes broader ideas about Black women. I argue that Black women’s online resistance to misogynoir is a form of activism that should be taken seriously as a health intervention. Representational images contribute to negative societal perceptions about Black women, which can precipitate racist gendered violence that harms health and can even result in death. Integrating two previously distinct lines of inquiry: queer and trans of color cultural studies and digital humanities, my project is unique in framing marginalized groups’ creation of digital media and use of social media as tools for resisting racist and sexist structural violence that directly impacts health. Using interviews, readings of digital images, and interdisciplinary analytical tools such as  Gephi, I examine the complex relationship between Black women and the violence enacted upon them in the digital realm.

Moya Bailey received her PhD in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies in 2013 from Emory University. She is currently a postdoctoral fellow in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Digital Humanities at Northeastern University and a member of the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks.