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Monthly Archives: September 2018

Two Postdoctoral Positions in Computational Social Science

Written on September 28, 2018 at 4:36 pm, by

Two postdoctoral positions in computational social science are available at the Network Science Institute, to work with David Lazer and Christoph Riedl. Candidates will be expected to work on a combination of their own research and collaborative projects within the institute. Research projects at the Network Science Institute usually include a mix of theoretical and  Continue Reading »

Article by NuLab Co-Director David Lazer in the Washington Post

Written on September 26, 2018 at 7:09 pm, by

Political outcomes today raise questions about how the interests of the majority are carried out by elected officials. Michael Neblo, Kevin Esterling and David Lazer have conducted a series of practical experiments that reveal hopeful possibilities about the connection between citizens and political figures. With population size, among other dimensions of public opinion, posing challenges to the reasonable access between  Continue Reading »

NULab Fall Calendar of Events

Written on September 26, 2018 at 11:09 am, by

The NULab is delighted to announce our fall calendar of events. We have some very exciting talks, workshops, and other events planned for the semester, organized around our year-long focus on digital storytelling. You can find additional details and registration information for these events at: http://web.northeastern.edu/nulab/events/. These events are free and open to the public  Continue Reading »

The DHSI Experience and the Ingenuity of Stylometry

Written on September 15, 2018 at 6:58 pm, by

By Molly Nebiolo, PhD Student in History, Northeastern University. I was able to fly to Canada to immerse myself in digital humanities for five days thanks to a course waiver awarded by DHSI and a NULab Seedling Grant that funded my transportation and housing for the workshop. Not only was I lucky enough to experience  Continue Reading »

New research by NULab Co-Director David Lazer covered in the Economist, Boston Globe, Time, and Forbes

Written on September 9, 2018 at 3:24 pm, by

A new paper “How intermittent breaks in interaction improve collective intelligence,” by Ethan Bernstein, Jesse Shore, and David Lazer has recently been published in PNAS. The paper examines the results of intermittent isolation on collective problem-solving:  “Many human endeavors—from teams and organizations to crowds and democracies—rely on solving problems collectively. Prior research has shown that when people interact and influence  Continue Reading »

NULab core faculty member Donghee Jo’s research featured in Washington Post

Written on September 9, 2018 at 3:06 pm, by

A recent article in the Washington Post “Bursting people’s political bubbles could make them even more partisan” discusses how new research explores how “despite decades of psychology research that shows fostering contact between ‘us’ and ‘them’ is a powerful way to reduce prejudice, scientists are starting to find that you can’t just shove people together — online  Continue Reading »

CFP: NULab Fall 2018 Grants

Written on September 7, 2018 at 8:44 am, by

NULab is once again inviting proposals for seedling grants, travel, and co-sponsorship of events related to digital humanities and computational social science. The deadline is November 2, 2018. Proposals should be submitted to Sarah Connell at sa.connell[at]northeastern[dot]edu. Seedling grant proposals should be no more than 2 pages, and travel and co-sponsorship proposals no more than  Continue Reading »

Digital Storytelling at the NULab in 2018–2019

Written on September 2, 2018 at 2:23 pm, by

The NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks is delighted to announce that our calendar of events for the 2018–2019 academic year will be focused around the theme of digital storytelling. We will be hosting a number of exciting talks, workshops, symposia, and other events, starting with the NULab/DSG Fall Welcome on September 24, co-hosted with the Digital  Continue Reading »