Publications

Conference Papers and Presentations over the Year

2020

(Fernandez-Molina and Bartolome Gutierrez 2020, Kokkalera, Marshall et al. 2020)

  • Fernandez-Molina, E. and R. Bartolome Gutierrez (2020). “Juvenile crime drop: What is happening with youth in Spain and why?” 17: 306-331 %J European Journal of Criminology.
  • Kokkalera, S. S., et al. (2020). “How Exceptional Is India? A Test of Situational Action Theory.” Asian Journal of Criminology.

This study explores the generalizability of Situational Action Theory (SAT) in India by testing hypotheses related to the person–environment interaction in explaining offending. Drawing on data from a sample of 872 students between the ages of 14 and 17 from an Indian city collected as part of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD3), we tested the hypothesis that Indian youths will report more delinquent acts if they have a higher propensity to commit crime combined with a greater exposure to criminogenic activities. Our findings show unequivocal support for the applicability of SAT in India where youths reported a slight increase in offending behavior if they exercised low self-control or if they were less moralistic (i.e., they were more crime-prone), or when exposed to criminal activities or peers. Consistent with tests of SAT in other contexts, we find that exposure to criminogenic environments increases offending for youth with higher levels of criminal propensity but does not impact youth with lower levels of criminal propensity. We speculate that the overall low rate of delinquent offending coupled with the cultural milieu of Indian youths may explain why criminogenic exposure may be less relevant in light of young people’s strong avoidance of rule-breaking.

2019

(Afkinich and Blachman-Demner 2019, Binik, Ceretti et al. 2019, DiPietro 2019, Finkelhor, Turner et al. 2019, Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children 2019, Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children 2019, Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children 2019, Maimon and Louderback 2019, Marshall and Neissl 2019, Marshall and Steketee 2019, Patton, Leonard et al. 2019, Pezzella, Fetzer et al. 2019, Song and Lee 2019, Steketee, Aussems et al. 2019, Turanovic 2019, U.S. Census Bureau 2019, Unnever, Gabbidon et al. 2019, Wikström 2019, World Population Review 2019)

 

  • Afkinich, J. L. and D. R. Blachman-Demner (2019). “Providing Incentives to Youth Participants in Research: A Literature Review.” Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: 1556264619892707.
  • The provision of financial incentives to youth involved in research remains an understudied and contentious issue. Although the practice is common and often accepted, a comprehensive understanding of the current status of the literature regarding the potential benefits and limitations is lacking. The primary question this article seeks to answer is as follows: ?What are the concerns and best practices identified in the literature for the appropriate and ethical provision of incentives to children and adolescents?? Following a thorough review and screening process, 25 articles were selected and central themes were identified within them. Themes include the following: the wage-payment model, effectiveness for recruitment, effectiveness for retention, financial versus alternative incentives, coerciveness, influence on validity of results, and other ethical dilemmas. Gaps in the literature are discussed. Overall, the literature suggests financial incentives can be provided appropriately to children as long as necessary precautions are taken.
  • Binik, O., et al. (2019). “Neighborhood Social Capital, Juvenile Delinquency, and Victimization: Results from the International Self-Report Delinquency Study – 3 in 23 Countries.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.
  • Since the beginning of the twentieth century, criminology has attempted to identify ecological factors affecting the rise or the decrease in crime rates. In this framework, concepts of “social disorganization”, “collective efficacy”, and “social capital” have been coined. Particularly in recent years, the perspective of “social capital” has attracted the interest of criminologists, but, despite the numerous studies conducted in this field, some issues remain open. Firstly, studies conducted outside the US context are few. Secondly, even in North American studies, there is a disagreement over the impact of social capital on crime, in particular on violent crimes. The results of this study, conducted on data obtained by the ISRD3 survey in 23 countries around the world, and addressed to 7th, 8th, and 9th grade students (N = 55,201), try to address such issue: they show a negative correlation between social capital and self-reported crime also outside North America, both for violent crimes and general delinquency. The preventive role played by social capital on crime is also confirmed considering the self-reported data on victimization.
  • DiPietro, S. M. (2019). “Roads diverged: An examination of violent and nonviolent pathways in the aftermath of the Bosnian war*.” Criminology 57(1): 74-104.
  • Finkelhor, D., et al. (2019). “Children’s Exposure to Violence: A comprehensive Natiopnal survey.” Juvenile Justice Bulletin October 2009.
  • Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children (2019). Corporal Punishment of Children in Belgium. London, Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children.
  • Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children (2019). Corporal Punishment of Children in Italy. London, Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children.
  • Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children (2019). Global Report 2018: Progress towards ending corporal punishment of children. UK.
  • Maimon, D. and E. R. Louderback (2019). “Cyber-Dependent Crimes: An Interdisciplinary Review.” Annual Review of Criminology 2(1): 191-216.
  • Marshall, I. H. and K. Neissl (2019). The International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD). International and Transnational Crime and Justice. M. Natarajan. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press: 476-482.
  • Marshall, I. H. and M. Steketee (2019). “What May Be Learned about Crime in Europe (and Beyond) from International Surveys of Youth: Results from the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD3).” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 25(3): 219-223.
  • Patton, D. U., et al. (2019). “What’s a Threat on Social Media? How Black and Latino Chicago Young Men Define and Navigate Threats Online.” Youth & Society 51(6): 756-772.
  • Youth living in violent urban neighborhoods increasingly post messages online from urban street corners. The decline of the digital divide and the proliferation of social media platforms connect youth to peer communities who may share experiences with neighborhood stress and trauma. Social media can also be used for targeted retribution when threats and insults are directed at individuals or groups. Recent research suggests that gang-involved youth may use social media to brag, post fight videos, insult, and threaten—a phenomenon termed Internet banging. In this article, we leverage “code of the digital street” to understand how and in what ways social media facilitates urban-based youth violence. We utilize qualitative interviews from 33 Black and Latino young men who frequent violence prevention programs and live in violent neighborhoods in Chicago. Emerging themes describe how and why online threats are conceptualized on social media. Implications for violence prevention and criminal investigations are discussed.
  • Pezzella, F. S., et al. (2019). “The Dark Figure of Hate Crime Underreporting.” American Behavioral Scientist: 000276421882384.
  • Song, H. and S. Lee (2019). “Motivations, Propensities, and Their Interplays on Online Bullying Perpetration: A Partial Test of Situational Action Theory.” Crime and Delinquency: 1-22.
  • Steketee, M., et al. (2019). “Exploring the Impact of Child Maltreatment and Interparental Violence on Violent Delinquency in an International Sample.” Journal of Interpersonal Violence: 088626051882329-undefined.
  • Turanovic, J. (2019). “Heterogeneous effects of adolescent violent victimization on problematic outcomes in early adulthood*.” Criminology 57(1): 105-135.
  • S. Census Bureau (2019). Quick Facts Massachusetts. Washington, DC, U.S. Census Bureau.
  • Unnever, J. D., et al. (2019). Building a black race criminology : race, theory and crime, New York, NY : Routledge.
  • Wikström, P.-O. H. (2019). “Explaining Crime and Criminal Careers: the DEA Model of Situational Action Theory.” Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology.

2018

(Bersani and Doherty 2018, Bersani, Fine et al. 2018, Brown and Bloom 2018, Carrington, Hogg et al. 2018, Chan, Arif et al. 2018, De Buck and Pauwels 2018, DiPietro, Doherty et al. 2018, Enzmann, Kivivuori et al. 2018, Gershoff 2018, Gottfredson 2018, Gottfredson 2018, Inchley, Currie D et al. 2018, Kammigan, Enzmann et al. 2018, Kokkalera, Marshall et al. 2018, Kokkalera, Marshall et al. 2018, Liu 2018, Manzoni and Schwarzenegger 2018, Marshall and Marshall 2018, Marshall and Marshall 2018, Martins, Mendes et al. 2018, NIJ 2018, Ozkan, Rocque et al. 2018, Perez, Jennings et al. 2018, Pino, Damus et al. 2018, Posick 2018, Roché and Mike Hough 2018, Roh and Marshall 2018, Schaefer, Moffitt et al. 2018, Simmons, Knight et al. 2018, Stuti, Chris et al. 2018, Vazsonyi, Javakhishvili et al. 2018, Weisburd, Cave et al. 2018, Wexler 2018, Wikström P-OH. and K. 2018)

 

  • Bersani, B. E. and E. E. Doherty (2018). “Desistance from Offending in the Twenty-First Century.” Annual Review of Criminology 1(1): 311-334.
  • Bersani, B. E., et al. (2018). “Investigating the Offending Histories of Undocumented Immigrants.” Migration Letters 15(2): 147-166.
  • This study investigates the association between undocumented immigration and crime among youthful offenders. Using official record and self-reported offending measures collected across seven-waves of data from the longitudinal Crossroads Study, the prevalence and variety of offending are compared for undocumented immigrant, documented immigrant, and US-born groups during the transition into young adulthood. Results suggest that, as compared to documented immigrants and US-born peers, undocumented immigrants report engaging in less crime prior to and following their first arrest. Conversely, official records reflect a marginally higher level of re-arrest among undocumented immigrants, particularly in the months immediately following the first arrest. This divergence in findings warrants focused consideration to disentangle whether the difference is due to differential involvement in crime, differential treatment in the justice system, or a combination of factors. Additional research is needed to test whether the results found in this study generalize to other immigrant groups and contexts. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
  • Copyright of Migration Letters is the property of Transnational Press London Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)
  • Brown, M. and B. E. Bloom (2018). “Women’s desistance from crime: A review of theory and the role higher education can play.” Sociology Compass 12(5).
  • Carrington, K., et al. (2018). The palgrave handbook of criminology and the global south, Springer.
  • Chan, E., et al. (2018). “<Chan, Arif & Nelson (2018).pdf>.”
  • De Buck, A. and L. J. R. Pauwels (2018). “Intention to shoplift: on the importance of dimensions of propensity in an integrated informal control/lifestyle model.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.
  • DiPietro, S., et al. (2018). “Understanding the Role of Marriage in Black Women’s Offending Over the Life Course.” Journal of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology 4(2): 162-187.
  • Enzmann, D., et al. (2018). A Global Perspective on Young People as Offenders and Victims. First Results from the ISRD3 Study, Springer.
  • Gershoff, E. T. (2018). “Corporal punishment associated with dating violence.” Journal of pediatrics 198: 322-325.
  • Gottfredson, M. (2018). Foreword. A Global Perspective on Young Offenders and Victims. First Results from the ISRD3 Study. D. Enzmann, J. Kivivuori, I. H. Marshall et al. New York, Springer: v-v111.
  • Gottfredson, M. R. (2018). “General Theory and Global Criminology: Childhood Environments, Problem Behaviors, and a Focus on Prevention.” Asian Journal of Criminology 13(4): 347-365.
  • General theories of crime and delinquency are tested in part by their ability to explain the empirical findings of cross-national research. Systematic research using comparable survey methods provides a rich body of data from many countries and settings that inform such tests. There are several aspects of the general theory proposed by Gottfredson and Hirschi (1990) that facilitate the idea of global criminology which, coupled with this growing research literature, support the idea of general theories of crime. These include use of a “crime-free” definition for dependent variables, disciplinary-free assumptions about human nature, appreciating the distinction between propensities and events in crime theory, incorporating the burgeoning empirical literature from many disciplines stressing the importance of childhood environments and self-control, and focusing on recent successful prevention efforts. A set of research needs stimulated by modern global criminology are also proposed.
  • Inchley, J., et al. (2018). Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) Study Protocol: Background, methodology and mandatory items for the 2017/2018 survey. St. Andrews, CAHRU.
  • Kammigan, I., et al. (2018). “Over- and underreporting of drug use: a cross-national inquiry of social desirability through the lens of situational action theory.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.
  • Kokkalera, S., et al. (2018). “The Role of Parental Maltreatment and Parental Social Control on Self-Reported Violent Offending in Indonesia and the U.S.: Does Gender Make a Difference?” Societies 8(2): 33-undefined.
  • Kokkalera, S. S., et al. (2018). “The Role of Parental Maltreatment and Parental Social Control on Self-Reported Violent Offending in Indonesia and the U.S.: Does Gender Make a Difference?” Societies 8(2).
  • Liu, J. (2018). The Asian criminological paradigm and how itlinks global North and South: Combining an extended conceptual tool box from the North with innovative Asian contexts. The Palgrave Handbook of Criminology and the Global South. K. Carrington, Palgrave: 61-82.
  • Manzoni, P. and C. Schwarzenegger (2018). “The Influence of Earlier Parental Violence on Juvenile Delinquency: The Role of Social Bonds, Self-Control, Delinquent Peer Association and Moral Values as Mediators.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.
  • Previous research demonstrated that children who had been exposed to physical maltreatment by parents are at higher risk of using violence as adolescents. It is assumed that parental violence unfolds negative influences on later delinquency directly and indirectly, that is, mediated through other crime predictors. This contribution presents an empirical test of theoretical propositions explaining this cycle of violence derived from three major theories, namely social learning, self-control and social control/bonding theory. Using data from 26 countries of the ISRD3 study, the mediating roles of delinquent peer association, crime-related moral values, self-control as well as family and school bonds among juveniles of grades 7 to 9 are assessed. Moreover, with exploratory intent, it is tested if the same mediating effects apply to each country. Overall the results showed both a significant direct effect of maltreatment on the use of violence and indirect (mediating) effects via each of the considered mediators. Delinquent peer association, self-control and family bonds had higher mediational strength than moral values and school bonds. This is in support of the theoretical assumptions of all three theories. Further, great variability of direct, indirect and total effects of maltreatment on violence across countries and within each mediator were observed. There is tentative evidence that the prevalence rates of maltreatment are negatively associated with the impact of maltreatment on later violence in the considered countries.
  • Marshall, I. H. and Marshall (2018). Norms, values and education: How different are immigrant youth from native Youth? Insights from the Third International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD3). Refugees and Migrants in Law and Policy: Challenges and Opportunities for Global Civic Education. H. Kury and S. Redo. New York, Springer.
  • Marshall, I. H. and C. E. Marshall (2018). Shame and Wrong: Is There a Common Morality Among Young People in France, the UK, the Netherlands, Germany, and the USA? Minority Youth and Social Integration: The ISRD-3 Study in Europe and the US. S. Roché and M. Hough. Cham, Springer International Publishing: 29-59.
  • The chapter analyzes morality as a dependent variable measured by survey responses of some 10,000 children in 7th, 8th, and 9th grade participating in the ISRD3 project in the UK, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the USA. The chapter empirically describes differences and commonalities in the values and norms of native-born pupils and their migrant counterparts, and it tests the hypothesis that the effect of migration status, parents, school, religion, and friends on morality will be similar in France, Germany, the UK, the Netherlands, and the USA. Psychometric analysis of the measures of morality (Pro-Social Values Index and Shame Index) supports cross-national measurement equivalence of the measures. We find broadly similar patterns of morality across these five countries, with some country-level variations in degree of moral consensus across children. Multivariate analysis shows higher levels of morality among girls, lower grades, and those who care about opinion of parents, and teachers, among all five youth samples. Religious affiliation is only of minor importance: Muslim pupils in the Netherlands and the UK score slightly lower on morality scales, but in the US, French, and German samples, this is not the case. The effects of being native-born and first- or second-generation immigrant on morality are weak and inconsistent, suggesting the need for country-specific analysis.
  • Martins, P. C., et al. (2018). “Juvenile Victimization in Portugal through the Lens of ISRD-3: Lifetime Prevalence, Predictors, and Implications.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.
  • NIJ (2018). Desistance from crime over the life course.
  • Ozkan, T., et al. (2018). “Reconsidering the Link Between Depression and Crime: A Longitudinal Assessment.” Criminal Justice and Behavior: 009385481879981-undefined.
  • Perez, N. M., et al. (2018). “A Path to Serious, Violent, Chronic Delinquency: The Harmful Aftermath of Adverse Childhood Experiences.” Crime & Delinquency 64(1): 3-25.
  • Adverse childhood experiences can affect the development of a child in many ways, leading to highly maladaptive behaviors, such as serious, violent, and chronic (SVC) delinquency. This study uses data from 64,329 Florida Department of Juvenile Justice youth, collected from 2007 to 2012, to examine both the direct and indirect effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on SVC delinquency. Using a generalized structural equation model, the effects of ACE scores are estimated on a youth’s likelihood of engaging in SVC delinquency while considering pathways through maladaptive personality traits (aggression and impulsivity), as well as adolescent problem behaviors (deviant peer imitation, school difficulties, substance abuse problems, and mental illness). The results suggest that a large proportion of the relationship between childhood adversity and SVC delinquency is mediated by maladaptive personality traits and adolescent problem behaviors. Study limitations and directions for future research are also discussed.
  • Pino, E., et al. (2018). “Adolescent socioeconomic status and depressive symptoms in later life: Evidence from structural equation models.” Journal of Affective Disorders 225: 702-708.
  • Posick, C. (2018). “Reappraising the impact of offending on victimization: a propensity score matching approach.” International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 62(8): 2374-2390.
  • Roché, S. and d. o.-.-.-.-. Mike Hough, Eds. (2018). Minorities, Institutions and Social Cohesion in Europe and the US: findings from the third International Self-Report Delinquency Study. New York, Springer.
  • Roh, M. and I. H. Marshall (2018). “A cross-cultural analysis of Agnew’s general theory of crime and delinquency.” 2: 301-321 %J Social Science and Humanities Journal.
  • Schaefer, J. D., et al. (2018). “Adolescent victimization and early-adult psychopathology: Approaching causal inference using a longitudinal twin study to rule
  • out noncausal explanations.” Clinical Psychological Science 6: 352-371.
  • Simmons, S. B., et al. (2018). “Long-Term Consequences of Intimate Partner Abuse on Physical Health, Emotional Well-Being, and Problem Behaviors.” Journal of Interpersonal Violence 33(4): 539-570.
  • This study examines the physical health, emotional well-being, and problem behavior outcomes associated with intimate partner abuse (IPA) victimization and perpetration experiences by analyzing a nationally representative, prospective, and longitudinal sample of 879 men and women collected from the National Youth Survey Family Study (NYSFS) and assessed across a period of 9 years from 1993 to 2003. Using multivariate regression techniques, it was found that both men and women experience numerous negative outcomes associated with their IPA victimization and perpetration experiences. Implications of these findings are discussed, as are the study’s limitations, and future research directions.
  • Stuti, S. K., et al. (2018). “The Role of Parental Maltreatment and Parental Social Control on Self-Reported Violent Offending in Indonesia and the U.S.: Does Gender Make a Difference?” Societies 8(2): 33.
  • In this article, we examine the role of parental maltreatment and parental social control in violent delinquency in two different countries: Indonesia and the U.S. but we go further by asking if gender makes a difference. We use a sample of Indonesian and U.S. youths from ISRD3 data, a self-reported survey instrument administered across multiple countries. We use logistic regressions to examine the associations between parental maltreatment, parental social control and self-reported violent delinquency and test whether gender and country modifies these associations. We find that both gender and country are significant predictors of violent delinquency. Further, there are differences between Indonesian and U.S. youths in terms of the predictors that are associated with violent delinquent offending. Specifically, parental maltreatment in the form of direct exposure to parental violence is a significant predictor for U.S. youths but not Indonesian youths whereas parental supervision is a significant deterrent of violent offending for both. We also find that girls are more likely to report violent offending than males when indirectly exposed to violence. Thus, our findings reiterate that both gender and context matter.
  • Vazsonyi, A. T., et al. (2018). “Routine activities and adolescent deviance across 28 cultures.” Journal of Criminal Justice 57: 56-66.
  • Purpose The current study tested the links between routine activities and deviance across twenty-eight countries, thus, the potential generalizability of the routine activities framework. Methods Data were collected as part of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD-2) from 28 cultures, from seventh, eighth, and ninth grade adolescents (N = 66,859). Routine activities were operationalized as family, peer, solitary, and community activities. Country-level predictors included unemployment rate, prison population, life expectancy, and educational attainment. Results Three-level, hierarchical linear modeling (individual, school, and country) was used to test both individual and country-level effects on deviance. Findings supported predictions by the routine activities framework, where routine activities explained 3.1% unique variance in deviance, above and beyond effects by background variables as well as low self-control. Models showed that the effects of family activities, solitary activities, and peer activities were stronger in countries with higher life expectancies. In addition, mean educational attainment increased the effect of solitary activities on deviance, while the effect of family activities on deviance was lower in countries with higher levels of unemployment. Conclusions The routine activities framework generalized across these 28 countries in how it explains deviance; some unique country-level effects were found that conditioned person-context links.
  • Weisburd, D., et al. (2018). “Mean Streets and Mental Health: Depression and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder at Crime Hot Spots.” American Journal of Community Psychology 61(3-4): 285-295.
  • Wexler, A. (2018). Don’t worry, be happy! The importance of furthering the study of happiness in the field of criminal justice, Northeastern University.
  • Wikström P-OH. and T. K. (2018). The dynamics of change: Criminogenic interactions and life course patterns in crime. The Oxford Handbook on Developmental and Life-Course Criminology. Farrington DP, K. L and P. AR. Oxford, Oxford University Press.

2017

(2017, Amemiya, Kieta et al. 2017, Basto-Pereira and Maia 2017, Blackie, Jayawickreme et al. 2017, Braga, Gonçalves et al. 2017, Carrington and Hogg 2017, Elliott 2017, Enzmann, Kivivuori et al. 2017, Farrington, Gaffney et al. 2017, Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children 2017, Grant 2017, Harris 2017, Hein, Barbot et al. 2017, Keatley, Allom et al. 2017, Leukfeldt, Lavorgna et al. 2017, Li and Cao 2017, Lowe, Joshi et al. 2017, Lukash and Killias 2017, Lynch, Swartz et al. 2017, Martínez-Ferrer and Stattin 2017, Rayburn and Wright 2017, Redo 2017, Rocque 2017, Savolainen, Applin et al. 2017, Stansfield 2017, Vazsonyi, Mikuška et al. 2017, Vazsonyi, Mikuška et al. 2017, Wagland and Bussey 2017, Wood and Dennard 2017)

  • Amemiya, J., et al. (2017). “Adolescent Offenders’ Qualitative Reflections on Desistance From Crime.” J Res Adolesc 27(4): 765-781.
  • Although many young offenders desist from crime during adolescence, little is known about this process. This study used a qualitative approach to elucidate adolescent offenders’ experiences in desisting from crime. Thirty-nine male adolescent offenders (Mage = 16.59 years) participated in a semistructured interview about the desistance process. One of four themes characterized adolescents’ reflections on their own desistance: having a psychological reorientation, reacting to consequences, persisting, or being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Adolescents discussed five agentic moves they make to facilitate desistance: seeking and maintaining supportive relationships, navigating peer groups, working toward long-term goals, structuring time, and finding sanctuaries from the outside. These findings highlight adolescents’ strengths, resources, and active role in desisting from crime.
  • Basto-Pereira, M. and Â. Maia (2017). “Persistence in Crime in Young Adults with a History of Juvenile Delinquency: the Role of Mental Health and Psychosocial Problems.” International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction 16(2): 496-506.
  • Blackie, L. E. R., et al. (2017). “Post-traumatic growth as positive personality change: Developing a measure to assess within-person variability.” Journal of Research in Personality 69: 22-32.
  • Braga, T., et al. (2017). “Unraveling the link between maltreatment and juvenile antisocial behavior: A meta-analysis of prospective longitudinal studies.” Aggression and Violent Behavior 33: 37-50.
  • Carrington, K. and R. Hogg (2017). “Deconstructing Criminology’s Origin Stories.” Asian Journal of Criminology 12(3): 181-197.
  • The global production of knowledge is grossly skewed to the northern Anglophone world (Hogg et al. in International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, 6(1), 1–7, 2017; Connell 2007). It should be no surprise therefore that criminology’s origin stories are derivative of northern experiences, yet generalised as universal theories of crime causation. In this article, we argue that the origin stories of criminological theory translated the ‘darker’, ‘hairier’ and ‘muscular’ masculinities of the global south into prototypes of dangerousness. These prototypes were first articulated as scientific claims in the nineteenth century works of Lombroso, but have been refined and embedded in mainstream criminological discourses well into the present, mainly through the quantitative study of social disorganisation, ‘race’ and racialised masculinities as variables in crime causation. The paper concedes that while deeply troubling expressions of violent masculinity exist now and in the past in the global south, it is mistaken to conceive this violence simply as expressions of atavism or social disorganisation associated with a less civilised world. On the contrary, this paper argues that the violence of colonality itself has had, and continues to have, a criminogenic impact on the present.
  • Elliott, D. (2017). Self-Report Crime Surveys.
  • Enzmann, D., et al. (2017). A Global Perspective on Young People as Offenders and Victims. First Results from the ISRD3 Study, Springer.
  • Farrington, D. P., et al. (2017). “Systematic reviews of explanatory risk factors for violence, offending, and delinquency.” Aggression and Violent Behavior 33: 24-36.
  • Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children (2017). Corporal Punishment of Children in Denmark. London, Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children.
  • Grant, L. (2017). “Violence in Jamaica’s High Schools.” African Journal of Criminology and Justice Studies 10(1): 39-60.
  • Harris, D. A. (2017). “Desistance From Sexual Offending: Behavioral Change Without Cognitive Transformation.” J Interpers Violence 32(20): 3049-3070.
  • The treatment and management of sexual offenders has long been focused on risk and recidivism. As a consequence, the phenomenon of desistance from sexual offending has only recently gained research attention. Unsurprisingly, the area of theory building to account for this empirical reality has been slow. Although a number of psychological theories of behavioral change and criminological theories of desistance exist, a comprehensive theoretical understanding of desistance from sexual offending is lacking. A theme common across a number of theories of internal desistance is cognitive transformation and specifically, one’s readiness for and willingness to change. This study tested the relevance of that particular theme for a sample of 45 men convicted of sexual offenses who are living offense-free lives in the community. In contrast to this theme, long-term desistance was observed in most cases in the absence of any initial desire for intervention. The impact of current approaches such as mandatory treatment is discussed and implications for future research and practice are presented.
  • Hein, S., et al. (2017). “Violent offending among juveniles: A 7-year longitudinal study of recidivism, desistance, and associations with mental health.” Law and Human Behavior 41(3): 273-283.
  • Keatley, D. A., et al. (2017). “The effects of implicit and explicit self-control on self-reported aggression.” Personality and Individual Differences 107: 154-158.
  • Leukfeldt, E. R., et al. (2017). “Organised Cybercrime or Cybercrime that is Organised? An Assessment of the Conceptualisation of Financial Cybercrime as Organised Crime.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 23(3): 287-300.
  • Criminological research over the last couple of decades has improved our understanding of cybercrimes. However, this body of research is regarded as still theoretically thin and not fully developed; more knowledge on the actors involved, their characteristics, and modus operandi is needed. Some publications recently suggested that organised crime is or might be involved in cybercrimes, which would have important policing implications, but evidence-based research on this point is still scarce and inconclusive. This article seeks to further this path of inquiry by providing a systematic analysis of 40 cases from The Netherlands, Germany, UK, and USA where criminal networks were involved in financial cybercrimes affecting the banking sector. It also assesses whether and to what extent these criminal networks meet the definitions of organised crime and discusses the theoretical and policing implications of our findings.
  • Li, H. and Y. Cao (2017). “Who’s holding the moral higher ground: Religiosity and the vertical conception of morality.” Personality and Individual Differences 106: 178-182.
  • Lowe, S. R., et al. (2017). “Pathways from assaultive violence to post-traumatic stress, depression, and generalized anxiety symptoms through stressful life events: longitudinal mediation models.” Psychological Medicine 47(14): 2556-2566.
  • Lukash, A. M. and M. Killias (2017). Who are Swiss and Ex-Yugoslavian Juveniles Who Have Been Involved in Group Fights? Results of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD-3).
  • Lynch, I., et al. (2017). “Anti-racist moral education: A review of approaches, impact and theoretical underpinnings from 2000 to 2015.” Journal of Moral Education 46(2): 129-144.
  • Martínez-Ferrer and H. Stattin (2017). “A mutual hostility explanation for the co-occurrence of delinquency and depressive
  • mood in adolescence.” Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 45: 1399-1412.
  • Rayburn, R. L. and J. D. Wright (2017). ““I Stopped Shooting Up When I got Married”: Desistance, Crime, and Love.” Deviant Behavior 39(10): 1294-1304.
  • Redo, S. (2017). New instruments and approaches for countering social exclusion: A criminological contribution to the united Nations post-2015 educational agenda. Current roblems of the penal law and criminology. E. W. Plywaczweski and E. M. Guzik-Makaruk. Warsaw, Wydawnictwo C.H. Beck. 7: 723-738.
  • Rocque, M. (2017). Desistance from Crime, Palgrave.
  • Savolainen, J., et al. (2017). “Does the Gender Gap in Delinquency Vary by Level of Patriarchy? A Cross-National Comparative Analysis.” Criminology 55(4): 726-753.
  • Stansfield, R. (2017). “Drawing on Religion in the Desistance Process: Paying Attention to Race and Ethnicity.” Criminal Justice and Behavior 44(7): 927-945.
  • Vazsonyi, A., et al. (2017). “It’s time: A meta-analysis on the self-control-deviance link.” Journal of Criminal Justice 48: 48-63.
  • Vazsonyi, A. T., et al. (2017). “It’s time: A meta-analysis on the self-control-deviance link.” Journal of Criminal Justice 48: 48-63.
  • Wagland, P. and K. Bussey (2017). “Appreciating the wrongfulness of criminal conduct: Implications for the age of criminal responsibility.” Legal and Criminological Psychology 22(1): 130-149.
  • Wood, J. and S. Dennard (2017). “Gang Membership: Links to Violence Exposure, Paranoia, PTSD, Anxiety, and Forced Control of Behavior in Prison.” Psychiatry 80(1): 30-41.
  • OBJECTIVE: Gang membership inherently links to violence, and violent experiences strongly relate to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and paranoia. Yet to date, gang members’ mental health has received little attention, and their paranoia has not been examined. This study, using established measures, assessed street gang and nongang prisoners’ levels of violence exposure, symptoms of PTSD, paranoia, and anxiety, forced behavioral control, and segregation in prison. METHOD: Participants were 65 (32 gang and 33 nongang) prisoners, recruited using opportunity sampling. Participants provided informed consent and were interviewed individually. Interviews were anonymized to maintain confidentiality. Chi-square and discriminant function analyses were used to compare participants’ demographics, segregation levels, mental health symptoms, and to identify predictors of street gang membership. RESULTS: As compared to nongang prisoners, street gang prisoners have higher levels of exposure to violence, symptoms of paranoia, PTSD, anxiety, and forced control of their behavior in prison. Street gang prisoners were not more likely to be segregated, but they were more likely to belong to ethnic minorities. Street gang prisoners were only found to be younger than nongang prisoners, when other variables were controlled for. CONCLUSIONS: Mental health deserves more attention in gang research. The implications of findings are that gang membership may undermine members’ mental health, and/or that individuals with existing mental health problems may be those attracted to gang membership. Moreover, justice responses, via policies and intervention strategies, need to identify and address the mental health needs in gang member prisoners, if successful rehabilitation of gang members is to be achieved.

2016

(Abeling-Judge 2016, Abrams and Tam 2016, Alleyne, Wood et al. 2016, Anderson 2016, Banks and Baker 2016, Berg and Cobbina 2016, Bernerth and Aguinis 2016, Brooks, Lowe et al. 2016, Brown 2016, Chui and Chan 2016, Dias 2016, Dias, Conde et al. 2016, DiPietro 2016, Doherty and Bersani 2016, EE and BE. 2016, Ellis, Abdi et al. 2016, Endendijk, Groeneveld et al. 2016, Gershoff and Font 2016, Hatipoglu-Aydin and Aydin 2016, Herlitz, Hough et al. 2016, Herlitz, Hough et al. 2016, International 2016, Killias and Monnet Lukash 2016, Koon-Magnin, Bowers et al. 2016, Kruttschnitt 2016, Laverick 2016, Lowe, Quinn et al. 2016, Lum, Coper et al. 2016, Manzoni, Killias et al. 2016, Marshall 2016, Meldrum, Connolly et al. 2016, Monnet Lukash 2016, Monnet Lukash and Killias 2016, Monnet Lukash and Killias 2016, Monnet Lukash and Killias 2016, Monnet Lukash, Siegmunt et al. 2016, Muggah, Szabo de Carvalho et al. 2016, Murray 2016, Paternoster, Bachman et al. 2016, Piquero, Bersani et al. 2016, Ren, Zhao et al. 2016, Rodermond, Kruttschnitt et al. 2016, Rodríguez, Pérez Santiago et al. 2016, Ronen, Hamama et al. 2016, Ryan, Teresa et al. 2016, Sampson and Laub 2016, Sampson and Laub 2016, Stankov and Lee 2016, Survey 2016, Vilalta 2016, Weisburd, Farrington et al. 2016, Wikström and K. 2016)

  • Abeling-Judge, D. (2016). “Different Social Influences and Desistance From Crime.” Criminal Justice and Behavior 43(9): 1225-1241.
  • Abrams, L. S. and C. C. Tam (2016). “Gender Differences in Desistance From Crime: How Do Social Bonds Operate Among Formerly Incarcerated Emerging Adults?” Journal of Adolescent Research 33(1): 34-57.
  • Life course theory suggests that the social bond of marriage can serve as a pivotal turning point toward the termination of criminal activity, particularly for men. Yet limited research has investigated how young adult men and women utilize social bonds forged outside of marriage to facilitate desistance from crime. This study explored gender differences in how formerly incarcerated emerging adults navigate and utilize their social bonds with peers and romantic partners on the journey toward criminal desistance. Two semi-structured qualitative interviews and a social mapping exercise were conducted with 14 emerging adults (seven men and seven women) with extensive histories of juvenile incarceration. With regard to friends, the young women found peer support often inconsistent, leading to an overarching theme of self-reliance. Some of the young men used peer supports with an overarching theme of reciprocity, while others used peer supports very sparingly in order to avoid contact with criminal associations or potential danger. With regard to romantic partnerships, these relationships proved much more supportive of desistance goals for the young men and thecontrary was the case for the young women in heterosexual partnerships. These findings add to a growing literature about the process of desistance for emerging adults.
  • Alleyne, E., et al. (2016). “Psychological and behavioural characteristics that distinguish street gang members in custody.” Legal and Criminological Psychology 21(2): 266-285.
  • Anderson, S. (2016). “The value of ‘bearing witness’ to desistance.” Probation Journal 63(4): 408-424.
  • Banks, C. and J. Baker (2016). Comparative, International, and Global Justice, Sage.
  • Berg, M. T. and J. E. Cobbina (2016). “Cognitive Transformation, Social Ecological Settings, and the Reentry Outcomes of Women Offenders.” Crime & Delinquency 63(12): 1522-1546.
  • Bernerth, J. and H. Aguinis (2016). “A Critical Review and Best-Practice Recommendations for Control Variable Usage.” Personnel Psychology 69(1): 229-283.
  • Brooks, M., et al. (2016). “Posttraumatic growth in students, crime survivors and trauma workers exposed to adversity.” Personality and Individual Differences 98: 199-207.
  • Brown, J. (2016). Psychiatry, Psychology, and Crime_ Historical and Current Aspects – Criminology -. Criminology – Oxford Bibliographies.
  • Chui, W. H. and H. C. Chan (2016). “The Gendered Analysis of Self-Control on Theft and Violent Delinquency.” Crime & Delinquency 62(12): 1648-1677.
  • Dias, J. (2016). The Perpetuation of Antisocial Behaviours in Young Cape Verdeans: A Predictive Study. IX Simpósio Nacional de Investigacao am Psicologia. University of the Algarve, Portugal.
  • Dias, J., et al. (2016). “Delincuencia Juvenil y Victimizacion en Cabo Verde: Indicadores de Prevalencia y Caracterización.” EUREKA 13(1): 24-38.
  • DiPietro, S. M. (2016). “Criminology and War.” Sociological Compass 10(10): 839-349.
  • Doherty, E. E. and B. E. Bersani (2016). “Understanding the Mechanisms of Desistance at the Intersection of Race, Gender, and Neighborhood Context.” J Res Crime Delinq 53(5): 681-710.
  • Objectives: This study tests theorized mechanisms of desistance, and whether the process of desistance is conditioned by social structural position. Methods: We investigate how marriage promotes desistance from crime among urban African American males raised in the Woodlawn community, a disadvantaged neighborhood in Chicago. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we test the resiliency of the marriage effect by observing offending trajectories following marital dissolution; is the marriage effect conditional upon staying married, indicating situational effects? or does the effect persist when marriage is taken away, indicating enduring effects? Further, we test if the process of desistance is conditional upon contextual disadvantage. Results: While initial findings show an increase in violent and property offending upon divorce, further analysis shows evidence that this effect differs by neighborhood structural context; the increase in offending upon divorce is apparent only for African American men who experience continued disadvantage across the life course. Those who moved to relatively more advantaged areas by adulthood show no increase in offending upon marital dissolution. Conclusions: How marriage matters for desistance is partially influenced by social structural position; context matters. These findings invigorate criminological research on the mechanisms driving the marriage effect and provide insight into the interactive nature of person and context.
  • EE, D. and B. BE. (2016). “Understanding the mechanisms of desistance at the intersection of race,
  • gender, and neighborhood context.” Res. Crime Delinq. 53: 681-710.
  • Ellis, B. H., et al. (2016). “Relation of psychosocial factors to diverse behaviors and attitudes among Somali refugees.” Am J Orthopsychiatry 86(4): 393-408.
  • Refugee studies have examined both resilience and adverse outcomes, but no research has examined how different outcomes co-occur or are distinct, and the social-contextual factors that give rise to these diverse outcomes. The current study begins to address this gap by using latent profile analysis to examine the ways in which delinquency, gang involvement, civic engagement, political engagement, and openness to violent extremism cluster among Somali refugees. We then use multivariable regression analyses to examine how adversity (e.g., discrimination, trauma, and marginalization) is associated with the identified latent classes. Data were collected from 374 Somali refugee young adults (Mage = 21.30 years, SD = 2.90, range 18-30, 38% female) from 4 different North American communities. Participants completed a structured survey assessing their experiences of adversity, delinquent and/or violent attitudes and behaviors (e.g., attitudes toward violent extremism, participation in delinquent behaviors, involvement in gangs), and positive outcomes (e.g., civic and political engagement). Our findings indicate that participants fall into 5 distinct groups, and that social-contextual and individual factors are uniquely related to those groups. Specifically, strong social bonds seem to be associated with positive outcomes. These findings point to the need to further examine both positive and negative outcomes, paying special attention to social-contextual factors. (PsycINFO Database Record
  • Endendijk, J. J., et al. (2016). “Gender-Differentiated Parenting Revisited: Meta-Analysis Reveals Very Few Differences in Parental Control of Boys and Girls.” PLOS ONE 11(7): e0159193.
  • Gershoff, E. T. and S. A. Font (2016). “Corporal punishment in US public schools: Prevalence, disparities in use, and status in state and federal policy.” Social policy report 30.
  • Hatipoglu-Aydin, D. and M. Aydin (2016). “The gender of justice system: Women’s access to justice in Turkey.” International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice 47: 71.
  • Access to justice as a practical and process based concept may be defined as the capacity of people to access judicial institutions which shall bring solution to common judicial problems of the people. While the burdens before access to justice are common for various groups, women may suffer more frequently accessing these institutions and have difficult time to overcome the burdens due to other structures which produce inequality. The article focuses on women’s access conditions to justice in Turkey and these conditions are assessed from the perspective of deficiency of normative frame and sufficient legal mechanisms which protect women’s rights, information deficiency regarding their rights, advice and representation deficiency in their legal problems, burdens before women’s access to judicial institutions, high proceeding costs, along with the slow pace to hear actions, complex procedures and corruption in the system, vagueness of legal language, and inability to execute court decisions topics.
  • Herlitz, L., et al. (2016). Understanding and Preventing Youth Crime in England: Key Findings. Booklet for Schools. London, ICPR.
  • Herlitz, L., et al. (2016). Understanding and Preventing Youth Crime in Scotland: Key Findings. Booklet for Schools. London, ICPR.
  • International, D. (2016). What Works in Reducing Community-Violence: A meta-review and field study for the Northern triangle, United States Agency for International Development.
  • Killias, M. and A. Monnet Lukash (2016). Comparing Juvenile Delinquency Across Time and Cultures: Contrasting Switzerland and Six Eastern European Countries Over Time. Conference of Universitat Oberta de Catalunya. Barcelona, Spain.
  • Koon-Magnin, S., et al. (2016). “Social Learning, Self-Control, Gender, and Variety of Violent Delinquency.” Deviant Behavior 37(7): 824-836.
  • Kruttschnitt, C. (2016). “THE POLITICS, AND PLACE, OF GENDER IN RESEARCH ON CRIME*.” Criminology 54(1): 8-29.
  • The study of gender and crime has grown exponentially over the past 40 years, but in some fundamental respects, it remains underdeveloped. Few scholars have considered both the similarities and the differences in the predictors of offending among males and females and the implication of this for middle‐range theories. Victimization has been put forth as a major explanatory factor for female offending yet the study of female victimization has been ghettoized because it has failed to address the ways in which it is related to the larger literature of victimization. Female inmates have always been characterized as having special needs, but the basic necessities (housing and employment) inmates require once they are released from prison are in fact gender neutral. These bodies of research all have suggested that the salience of gender varies in different contexts and is intermixed with other forms of stratification. As such, we would do well to attend to those situations and relational processes that foreground gender and focus our efforts on where gender‐based paradigms are important and can have a real impact.
  • Laverick, W. (2016). Global Injustice and Crime Control, Routledge.
  • Lowe, S., et al. (2016). “Childhood trauma and neighborhood-level crime interact in predicting adult posttraumatic stress and major depression symptoms.” Child abuse & neglect 51: 212-222.
  • Manzoni, P., et al. (2016). The Influence of Earlier Parental Violence on Juvenile Delinquency – The Role of Self-Control, Social Bonds, Delinquent Peer Association and Routine Activities as Mediators in Austria and Switzerland. 16th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Munster, Germany.
  • Marshall, I. H. (2016). Results of the second round of the International Self-Report Delinquency (ISRD2) Study: Importance of education and social learning for 12-15 year olds. Women and Children as Victims and Offenders: Background, Prevention, Reintegration. H. Kury, S. Redo and E. Shea. Cham, Switzerland, Springer International Publishing. 1: 291-309.
  • Meldrum, R. C., et al. (2016). “Parental Low Self-Control, Family Environments, and Juvenile Delinquency.” Int J Offender Ther Comp Criminol 60(14): 1623-1644.
  • Research consistently finds that low self-control is significantly correlated with delinquency. Only recently, however, have researchers started to examine associations between parental low self-control, family environments, and child antisocial behavior. Adding to this emerging area of research, the current study examines associations between parental low self-control, aspects of the family environment, and officially recoded juvenile delinquency among a sample (N = 101) of juveniles processed through a juvenile justice assessment facility located in the Southeastern United States. Furthermore, it considers whether aspects of family environments, particularly family cohesion, family conflict, and parental efficacy, mediate the influence of parental low self-control on delinquency. The results of a series of analyses indicate that parental low self-control is correlated with various aspects of family environments and juvenile delinquency, and that the association between parental low self-control and juvenile delinquency is mediated by family environments. Supplementary analyses also suggest that the association between parental low self-control and the family environment may be reciprocal.
  • Monnet Lukash, A. (2016). Gewalttätige Übergriffe begangen von Jugendlichen in der Schweiz und in der Ukraine. Elterliche Kontrolle und Freizeitverhalten in gut/schlecht kontrollierten Gesellschaften. Resultate von ISRD-3. Forschungsgruppe von Prof. Dr. iur. Dr. h.c. Martin Killias. Vortrag im Rahmen des 52. Kolloquiums der Südwestdeutschen und Schweizerischen Kriminologischen Institute und Lehrstühle vom 08.07. bis 10.07.2016.
  • Monnet Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2016). Everywhere the Same Factor? Do Explanations of Violence Hold Among Native and Immigrant Youths? Stockholm Criminology Symposium. Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Monnet Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2016). Juvenile Delinquency and Victimization in Switzerland and Ukraine. The Role of Family Variables. Results of the ISRD-3. 16th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Munster, Germany.
  • Monnet Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2016). Juvenile Deliquency Among Youths with Ex-Yugoslavian Origin in Switzerland, Macedonia, Serbia, Kosovo and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Has Violence Among Juveniles Been “Imported”? 16th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Munster, Germany.
  • Monnet Lukash, A., et al. (2016). Juvenile Delinquency, Victimization and Bonding to School in Switzerland. The Role of School Class Homogeneity. Results of the ISRD-3. 16th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Munster, Germany.
  • Muggah, R., et al. (2016). Making Cities Safer: citizen Security Innovations from Latin America, IGARAPÉ INSTITUTE, Inter-American Development Bank. Strategic Paper 20 June.
  • Murray, K. (2016). Understanding and Preventing Youth Crime Survey (UPYC) Early Findings. Stop and Search in Glasgow and Edinburgh. Edinburgh, University of Edinburgh.
  • Paternoster, R., et al. (2016). “Desistance from Crime and Identity.” Criminal Justice and Behavior 43(9): 1204-1224.
  • Piquero, A. R., et al. (2016). “Longitudinal Patterns of Legal Socialization in First-Generation Immigrants, Second-Generation Immigrants, and Native-Born Serious Youthful Offenders.” Crime & Delinquency 62(11): 1403-1425.
  • Ren, L., et al. (2016). “Testing For Measurement Invariance of Attachment Across Chinese and American Adolescent Samples.” International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 60(8): 964-991.
  • Rodermond, E., et al. (2016). “Female desistance: A review of the literature.” European Journal of Criminology 13(1): 3-28.
  • Rodríguez, J. A., et al. (2016). “Internationalizing the Study of Gang Membership: Validation Issues from Latin America.” British Journal of Criminology published online 21 July 2016.
  • Ronen, T., et al. (2016). “Subjective Well-Being in Adolescence: The Role of Self-Control, Social Support, Age, Gender, and Familial Crisis.” Journal of Happiness Studies 17(1): 81-104.
  • Focusing on adolescents’ subjective well-being, the present study comprised three parts. The first examined the role of two coping mechanisms, self-control and social support, in predicting subjective well-being. The second related to the role of age and gender in predicting adolescents’ subjective well-being. The third raised the question of whether exposure to familial crisis would predict adolescents’ subjective well-being and whether self-control and social support would moderate the link between crisis and adolescents’ subjective well-being. Participants included 380 adolescents ages 13–17 years (M = 15.32, SD = .98; 194 boys, 176 girls, 10 unspecified), from six integrative junior-high and high schools in central Israel. All schools served a heterogeneous Jewish student population. Based on responses to a questionnaire identifying adolescents who reported experiencing a severe life crisis during the last year (e.g., severe illness in family, parent death or separation/divorce), the sample was divided into two groups: exposure to familial crisis (n = 96) and no exposure to familial crisis (n = 284). Outcomes revealed that both self-control and social support predicted adolescents’ subjective well-being. As expected, older adolescents presented lower levels of subjective well-being than younger ones. In contrast to the hypothesis, gender did not predict subjective well-being. Although exposure to crisis did not predict higher negative affect or lower positive affect, an interaction emerged between self-control and crisis in predicting positive affect. Thus, among adolescents who experienced crisis, better self-control skills predicted higher levels of positive affect.
  • Ryan, C. M., et al. (2016). “At the End of Their Rope: A Research Note on the Influence of Parental Low Self-Control and Juvenile Delinquency on Parental Exasperation.” Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 15(3): 314-324.
  • The concept of self-control has been used to account for a wide variety of outcomes, both criminal and otherwise. Recently, researchers have started investigating associations between parental self-control and family functioning. This study expands this area of research by assessing the extent to which parental low self-control and official involvement in juvenile delinquency is associated with parental exasperation among a sample of parents (N = 101) whose children have been processed through a juvenile justice assessment facility. The results indicate that parents who are lower in self-control and whose children have had more extensive involvement in officially recorded delinquency report greater exasperation regarding their children. In addition, the data indicate the effect of parental low self-control on parental exasperation is stronger at higher levels of delinquent behavior. The implications of the study and directions for future research are discussed.
  • Sampson, R. J. and J. H. Laub (2016). “A Life-Course View of the Development of Crime.” The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 602(1): 12-45.
  • Sampson, R. J. and J. H. Laub (2016). “Turning Points and the Future of Life-Course Criminology.” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 53(3): 321-335.
  • Stankov, L. and J. Lee (2016). “Nastiness, Morality and Religiosity in 33 nations.” Personality and Individual Differences 99: 56-66.
  • Survey, E. S. (2016). Attitudes towards Immigration and their Antecedents.
  • Vilalta, C. J. (2016). Crime and Justice in Latin America. Oxford Bibliographies.
  • Weisburd, D., et al., Eds. (2016). What Works in Crime Prevention and Rehabilitation. Lessons from Systematic Reviews. Springer Series on Evidence-Based Crime Policy. New York, Springer.
  • Wikström, P.-O. H. and T. K. (2016). Situational theory: The importance of interactions and action mechanisms in the explanation of crime. The Handbook of Criminological Theory. P. A. (ed.). Chichester, John Wiley.

2015

(Agnew 2015, Ahmed 2015, Bachman, Kerrison et al. 2015, Bezic 2015, Born, Cattelino et al. 2015, Botchkovar, Marshall et al. 2015, Bräker, Göbel et al. 2015, Dong and Krohn 2015, Enzmann, H. Marshall et al. 2015, Fader JJ and LL. 2015, Fazel, Wolf et al. 2015, Gatti, Soellner et al. 2015, Gavray 2015, Gavray 2015, Gavray and Boulard 2015, Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children 2015, Hawkes 2015, Innamorati and Maniglio 2015, Jaitman and Compean 2015, Jaitman and Compeán 2015, Jennings, Mitchell et al. 2015, Keyes, Leray et al. 2015, Kirkwood and McNeill 2015, Loeber, Farrington et al. 2015, Lukash and Killias 2015, Manzoni and Fischbacher-Ott 2015, Manzoni, Fischbacher et al. 2015, Marshall and Marshall 2015, Marshall, Enzmann et al. 2015, Martins, Mendes et al. 2015, Mathéy 2015, McCaffree 2015, McCaffree 2015, McDougall and Vaillancourt 2015, McKay and Whitehouse 2015, Messner 2015, Monnet Lukash and Killias 2015, Monnet Lukash and Killias 2015, Moravcová, Podaná et al. 2015, NAGIN, SOLOW et al. 2015, Neville, Goodall et al. 2015, Office 2015, Palmer, Mattar et al. 2015, Piquero 2015, Piquero, Cardwell et al. 2015, Posick and Gould 2015, Posick and Rocque 2015, Ren, Zhao et al. 2015, Rocque 2015, Rocque, Posick et al. 2015, Rocque, Posick et al. 2015, Rodríguez, Pérez-Santiago et al. 2015, Rodríguez, Pérez-Santiago et al. 2015, Rothe and O’Friedrichs 2015, Sayed, Piquero et al. 2015, Shah 2015, Stuewig, Tangney et al. 2015, Turanovic and Pratt 2015, United Nations 2015, Vakhitova, Reynald et al. 2015, Visser, Telman et al. 2015, Widom and Wilson 2015)

  • Agnew, R. (2015). “Using General Strain Theory to Explain Crime in Asian Societies.” Asian Journal of Criminology 10(2): 131-147.
  • This paper provides an overview of general strain theory (GST) and argues that the theory can shed much light on the causes of crime in Asian societies. The paper is in five parts, with these parts describing (1) the strains most likely to cause crime; (2) why these strains cause crime; (3) the factors influencing whether strained individuals cope through crime; (4) how GST explains group differences in crime, such as the higher crime rate of males; and (5) how GST explains changes in crime over time, such as the recent increase in delinquency in certain Asian societies. Each section begins by describing the key arguments of GST and the research on these arguments. This is followed by a discussion of the extent to which these arguments apply to Asian societies. GST is said to be quite applicable to Asian societies. For example, most of the strains that cause crime in Western societies also cause crime in Asian societies. At the same time, it is argued that GST should be revised somewhat in order to best explain crime in Asian societies. Researchers, for example, should take account of the greater emphasis on collectivistic values in many Asian societies, including the value placed on social harmony and self-restraint. These values influence the events and conditions that function as strains and the reaction to strains. In making these arguments, the paper draws heavily on the research that has applied GST to Asian societies, most commonly to Chinese, Taiwanese, and South Korean communities.
  • Ahmed, S. (2015). “The ‘emotionalization of the “war on terror”’: Counter-terrorism, fear, risk, insecurity and helplessness.” Criminology &amp; Criminal Justice 15(5): 545-560.
  • The ‘war on terror’ has marked the existence of exceptional measures involving military action abroad and the introduction of counter-terrorism legislation in the United Kingdom. Within this context fear, risk and insecurity have been intrinsic in legitimizing the measures created as being necessary to maintain national security. This article presents the findings from a study investigating the impact of the ‘war on terror’ on British Muslims’ emotions. The study revealed how facets of the ‘war on terror’, including ‘human rights and policing’, ‘What if? and pre-emption’, ‘geopolitics and reflexive fear and risk’ and ‘fear from inside the binary’ impacted participants’ emotions. Through exploring how thepolicy measures implemented in the ‘war on terror’ have influenced British Muslims’ emotions, the article takes a small step in addressing the analytical gap in criminological research on emotions in the ‘war on terror’.
  • Bachman, R., et al. (2015). “Desistance for a Long-Term Drug-Involved Sample of Adult Offenders.” Criminal Justice and Behavior 43(2): 164-186.
  • Bezic, R. (2015). ISRD3 Technical Report (Croatia).
  • Born, M., et al. (2015). Adolescent Delinquent Behaviours as Attempts of Group Social Integration and Well-Being Through Social Acceptance? Youth, Offense and Well-Being. Can Science Enlighten Policy? Carneiro. Lisbon, CEPCEP – Centro de Estudos dos Povos e Culturas de Expressão Portuguesa: 163-176.
  • Botchkovar, E., et al. (2015). “The importance of parenting in the development of self-control in boys and girls: Results from a multinational study of youth.” 43: 133-141 %J Journal of Criminal Justice.
  • Bräker, A.-B., et al. (2015). “Adolescent Alcohol Use Patterns From 25 European Countries.” Journal of Drug Issues (published online before print edition): 1-15.
  • Dong, B. and M. D. Krohn (2015). “Exploring Intergenerational Discontinuity in Problem Behavior: Bad Parents with Good Children.” Youth Violence Juv Justice 13(2): 99-122.
  • Using data from the Rochester Youth Development Study, a series of regression models are estimated on offspring problem behavior with a focus on the interaction between parental history of delinquency and the parent-child relationship. Good parenting practices significantly interact with the particular shape of parental propensity of offending over time, functioning as protective factors to protect against problematic behaviors among those who are most at risk. The moderation effects vary slightly by the age of our subjects. Accordingly, it is important to distinguish the effect of not only the level of parental delinquency at one point in time, but also the shape of the delinquency trajectory on outcomes for their children. Good parenting holds the hope of breaking the vicious cycle of intergenerational transmission of delinquency.
  • Enzmann, D., et al. (2015). Second International Self-Reported Delinquency Study, 2005-2007, Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor].
  • Fader JJ and T. LL. (2015). “Dealing with difference in desistance theory: the promise of intersectionality for new avenues of inquiry.” Compass 9: 247-260.
  • Fazel, S., et al. (2015). “Depression and violence: A Swedish
  • population study.” The Lancet Psychiatry 2: 224-232.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2015). “Delinquency and Alcohol Use Among Adolescents in Europe: The Role of Cultural Contexts.” European Journal of Criminology 12(3): 362-377.
  • Gavray, C. (2015). Binge Drinking at a Young Age. Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Porto.
  • Gavray, C. (2015). L’école rebondit au coeur des malentendus : résultats de recherches croisées quantitatives et qualitatives. Au cœur des malentendus. Liege.
  • Gavray, C. and A. Boulard (2015). Environnement incertain et passage à l’acte violent à l’adolescence. Adolescence contemporaine et environnement. Amiens.
  • Global Initiative to End All Corporal Punishment of Children (2015). Prohibiting and eliminating violent punishment of girls: A key element in guaranteeing the health and safety of women and girls worldwide, Global initiative to end all coprporal punishment of children.
  • Hawkes, N. (2015). “People with depression are more likely to commit violent crime, study concludes.” theBMJ (British Medical Journal) 2015(23 Feb – 01 Mar): h1083-undefined.
  • Innamorati, M. and R. Maniglio (2015). “Psychosocial correlates of alcohol use and heavy episodic drinking among Italian adolescents: Data from the second International Self-Reported Delinquency study.” The American Journal on Addictions XX: 1-8.
  • Jaitman, L. and R. G. Compean (2015). Closing Knowledge Gaps: Toward Evidence-Based Crime Prevention Policies in Latin America and the Caribbean, Inter-American Development Banl.
  • Jaitman, L. and R. G. Compeán (2015). Closing knowledge gaps: toward evidence-based crime prevention policies in Latin America and the Caribbean, InterAmerican Development Bank. October.
  • Jennings, P. L., et al. (2015). “The moral self: A review and integration of the literature.” Journal of Organizational Behavior 36(S1): S104-S168.
  • Keyes, K., et al. (2015). “Parental use of corporal punishment in Europe: intersection between public health and policy.” PLOS ONE 10(2): e0118059.
  • Kirkwood, S. and F. McNeill (2015). “Integration and reintegration: Comparing pathways to citizenship through asylum and criminal justice.” Criminology and Criminal Justice 15(5): 511-526.
  • Loeber, R., et al. (2015). “Constancy and change in the prevalence and frequency of offending when based on longitudinal self-reports or official records: Comparisons by gender, race and crime type.” Journal of Developmental Life Course Criminology 1: 150 – 168.
  • Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2015). Parental Control and its Influence on Juvenile Delinquency in Switzerland, Kosovo, Macedonia and Serbia. Results of ISRD-3. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. Washington, D.C.
  • Manzoni, P. and R. Fischbacher-Ott (2015). Explaining Juvenile Delinquency in Austria – A test of Situational Action Theory. Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Porto.
  • Manzoni, P., et al. (2015). Jugendkriminalität in Österreich aus Täter- und Opferperspektive. Resultate der dritten “International Self-Report Delinquency”-Studie (ISRD-3). Zürich, Dike.
  • Marshall, C. and I. H. Marshall (2015). “Jeugddelinquentie in vergelijkend perspectief: Vertellen micro-en macroanalyses hetzelfde verhaal?” 57: 170-202 %J Tijdschrift voor Criminologie.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2015). Youth Victimization and Reporting to Police. First Results from the Third Round of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD3). ISRD3 Technical Report Series #3.
  • Martins, P., et al. (2015). Cross-cultural adaptation and online administration of the Portuguese Version of ISRD-3. 15th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Porto.
  • Mathéy, K. (2015). Community-based urban violence prevention : innovative approaches in Africa, Latin America, Asia and the Arab Region. Bielefeld, transcript.
  • McCaffree, K. (2015). What Morality Means : An Interdisciplinary Synthesis for the Social Sciences. New York, US, Palgrave Macmillan.
  • McCaffree, K. (2015). What Morality Means : An Interdisciplinary Synthesis for the Social Sciences. New York, US: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. New York, US: Palgrave Macmillan,, Palgrave Macmillan,.
  • McDougall, P. and T. Vaillancourt (2015). “Long-term adult outcomes of peer victimization in childhood and adolescence:
  • Pathways to adjustment and maladjustment.” American Psychologist, 70, 300–310. 70: 300-310.
  • McKay, R. and H. Whitehouse (2015). “Religion and morality.” Psychol Bull 141(2): 447-473.
  • The relationship between religion and morality has long been hotly debated. Does religion make us more moral? Is it necessary for morality? Do moral inclinations emerge independently of religious intuitions? These debates, which nowadays rumble on in scientific journals as well as in public life, have frequently been marred by a series of conceptual confusions and limitations. Many scientific investigations have failed to decompose “religion” and “morality” into theoretically grounded elements; have adopted parochial conceptions of key concepts-in particular, sanitized conceptions of “prosocial” behavior; and have neglected to consider the complex interplay between cognition and culture. We argue that to make progress, the categories “religion” and “morality” must be fractionated into a set of biologically and psychologically cogent traits, revealing the cognitive foundations that shape and constrain relevant cultural variants. We adopt this fractionating strategy, setting out an encompassing evolutionary framework within which to situate and evaluate relevant evidence. Our goals are twofold: to produce a detailed picture of the current state of the field, and to provide a road map for future research on the relationship between religion and morality.
  • Messner, S. F. (2015). “When West Meets East: Generalizing Theory and Expanding the Conceptual Toolkit of Criminology.” Asian Journal of Criminology 10(2): 117-129.
  • This paper considers the ways in which established criminological theories born and nurtured in the West might need to be transformed to be applicable to the context of East Asian societies. The analyses focus on two theoretical perspectives—Situational Action Theory and Institutional Anomie Theory—that are located at opposite ends of the continuum with respect to levels of analysis. I argue that the accumulated evidence from cross-cultural psychology and criminological research in East Asian societies raises serious questions about the feasibility of simply transporting these perspectives from the West to the East. Instead, my analyses suggest that the formulation of theoretical explanations of crime that are truly universal will require criminologists to create and incorporate new concepts that are more faithful to the social realities of non-Western societies, societies such as those in East Asia and Asia more generally.
  • Monnet Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2015). Are Different Rates of Juvenile Delinquency and Victimization Across Nations Really Different? The 15th Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Porto, Portugal.
  • Monnet Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2015). Die elterliche Kontrolle, ihre Wirkung auf die Jugendkriminalität in der Schweiz sowie in Kosovo, Serbien, Mazedonien, der Ukraine und Indonesien. Resultate der ISRD-3. Kolloquium der Südwestdeutschen und Schweizerischen Kriminologischen Institute. Lambracht, Germany.
  • Moravcová, E., et al. (2015). Delikvence mládeže: Trendy a souvislosti. Praha, Triton.
  • NAGIN, D. S., et al. (2015). “DETERRENCE, CRIMINAL OPPORTUNITIES, AND POLICE.” Criminology 53(1): 74-100.
  • In this article, we join three distinct literatures on crime control—the deterrence literature, the policing literature as it relates to crime control, and the environmental and opportunity perspectives literature. Based on empirical findings and theory from these literatures, we pose a mathematical model of the distribution of criminal opportunities and offender decision making on which of those opportunities to victimize. Criminal opportunities are characterized in terms of the risk of apprehension that attends their victimization. In developing this model, our primary focus is on how police might affect the distribution of criminal opportunities that are attractive to would-be offenders. The theoretical model we pose, however, is generalizable to explain how changes in other relevant target characteristics, such as potential gain, could affect target attractiveness. We demonstrate that the model has important implications for the efficiency and effectiveness of police deployment strategies such as hot spots policing, random patrol, and problem-oriented policing. The theoretical structure also makes clear why the clearance rate is a fundamentally flawed metric of police performance. Future research directions suggested by the theoretical model are discussed.
  • Neville, F. G., et al. (2015). “Public health, youth violence, and perpetrator well-being.” Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology 21(3): 322-333.
  • Youth violence poses a significant public health issue due to its health antecedents (e.g., health inequalities, mental health issues, alcohol misuse) and consequences (i.e., physical and psychological morbidity, and mortality). While violence and its desistance have traditionally been the purview of the criminal justice system, the importance of a preventative public health approach has been increasingly acknowledged. The public health approach employs scientific methods, seeks to intervene at multiple levels (primary, secondary and tertiary), and advocates for the involvement of multidisciplinary stakeholders. This article outlines the public health approach to youth violence; discusses examples of current public health research into youth violence prevention (i.e., school-based interventions, and gang interventions); and provides a brief review of the evidence regarding youth violence perpetrators and well-being, which suggests mixed outcomes (positive and negative) depending upon intentionality of violence, and congruency with group norms. The article concludes by highlighting future research directions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
  • Office, H. (2015). Preventing youth violencea and gang involvement. Practical advice for schools and colleges.
  • Contents
  • Introduction
  • What does the law say about youth violence and
  • teachers’ powers?
  • Preventing violence
  • Understanding the issue
  • Seeking support
  • Working with other local partners to address the issue
  • Primary schools and early intervention
  • Risk factors
  • What works in preventing violence in schools and colleges
  • Who to involve
  • Evidence on general approaches
  • Sources of evidence
  • Assessing specific programmes
  • Targeting a programme, or developing a new one
  • Resource A: Legal powers
  • Staff powers
  • Joint enterprise
  • Gangs, firearms and knives
  • Resource B: What works in preventing violence and
  • aggressive behaviour?
  • Resource C: Repositories of evidence (evaluated and new/
  • developing programmes) and other resources for schools
  • Resource D: How do you know if a programme has been
  • effective in the past?
  • Resource E: What if there is no specific evidence, or the
  • programme is new?
  • Palmer, V. V., et al. (2015). Mixed Legal Systems, East and West. Farnham, UNITED KINGDOM, Routledge.
  • Piquero, A. R. (2015). “What we know and what we need to know about developmental and life-course theories.” Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology 48(3): 336-344.
  • Piquero, A. R., et al. (2015). “How well do the adolescent risk factors predict re-arrest frequency across race/ethnicity among serious adolescent offenders?” Journal of Crime and Justice 39(1): 189-209.
  • Posick, C. and L. A. Gould (2015). “On the general relationship between victimization and offending: Examining cultural contingencies.” Journal of Criminal Justice 43(4): 195-204.
  • Posick, C. and M. Rocque (2015). “Family matters: A cross-national examination of family bonding and victimization.” European Journal of Criminology 12(1): 51-69.
  • Ren, L., et al. (2015). “Testing For Measurement Invariance of Attachment Across Chinese and American Adolescent Samples.” International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology.
  • Adolescent attachment to formal and informal institutions has emerged as a major focus of criminological theories since the publication of Hirschi’s work in 1969. This study attempts to examine the psychometric equivalence of the factorial structure of attachment measures across nations reflecting Western and Eastern cultures. Twelve manifest variables are used tapping the concepts of adolescent attachment to parents, school, and neighborhood. Confirmatory factor analysis is used to conduct invariance test across approximately 3,000 Chinese and U.S. adolescents. Results provide strong support for a three-factor model; the multigroup invariance tests reveal mixed results. While the family attachment measure appears invariant between the two samples, significant differences in the coefficients of the factor loadings are detected in the school attachment and neighborhood attachment measures. The results of regression analyses lend support to the predictive validity of three types of attachment. Finally, the limitations of the study are discussed.
  • Rocque, M. (2015). “The lost concept: The (re)emerging link between maturation and desistannce from crime.” Criminology and Criminal Justice 15(3): 340-360.
  • Rocque, M., et al. (2015). “A comparative, cross-cultural criminal career analysis.” European Journal of Criminology 12(4): 400-419.
  • Rocque, M., et al. (2015). “A comparative, cross-cultural criminal career analysis.” 12: 400-419 %J European Journal of Criminology.
  • Rodríguez, J., et al. (2015). “Surveys as cultural artefacts: Applying the International Self-Report Delinquency Study to Latin American adolescents.” European Journal of Criminology 12(4): 420-436.
  • Rodríguez, J. A., et al. (2015). “Surveys as cultural artefacts: Applying the International Self-Report Delinquency Study to Latin American adolescents.” European Journal of Criminology 12(4): 420-436.
  • Rothe, D. and D. O’Friedrichs (2015). Crimes of Globalization, Routledge.
  • Sayed, S. E., et al. (2015). “Assessing the Mental Health/Offending Relationship Across Race/Ethnicity in a Sample of Serious Adolescent Offenders.” Criminal Justice Policy Review 27(3): 265-301.
  • Shah, A. (2015). The cultural faces of shame. Shame : Developmental, Cultural, and Clinical Realms. S. Akhtar. London, GB:, Karnac Books: 49-70.
  • Stuewig, J., et al. (2015). “Children’s Proneness to Shame and Guilt Predict Risky and Illegal Behaviors in Young Adulthood.” Child Psychiatry & Human Development 46(2): 217-227.
  • Do shame and guilt help people avoid doing wrong? Although some research suggests that guilt-proneness is a protective factor while shame-proneness puts individuals at risk, most research is either cross-sectional or short-term. In this longitudinal study, 380 5th graders (ages 10–12) completed measures of proneness to shame and guilt. We re-interviewed 68 % of participants after they turned 18 years old (range 18–21). Guilt-proneness assessed in childhood predicted fewer sexual partners, less use of illegal drugs and alcohol, and less involvement with the criminal justice system. Shame-proneness, in contrast, was a risk factor for later deviant behavior. Shame-prone children were more likely to have unprotected sex and use illegal drugs in young adulthood. These results held when controlling for childhood SES and teachers’ ratings of aggression. Children’s moral emotional styles appear to be well established by at least middle childhood, with distinct downstream implications for risky behavior in early adulthood.
  • Turanovic, J. J. and T. C. Pratt (2015). “Longitudinal effects of violent victimization during adolescence on adverse outcomes
  • in adulthood: A focus on prosocial attachments.” Journal of Pediatrics, 166, 1062–1069. 166: 1062–1069.
  • United Nations (2015). Resolution adopted by the General Assembly on 17 December 2015 . Doha declaration on integrating crime prevention and criminal justice into the wider United Nations agenda to address social and economic challenges and to promote the rule of law at the national and international levels, and public participation A/RES/70/74.
  • Vakhitova, Z. I., et al. (2015). “Toward the Adaptation of Routine Activity and Lifestyle Exposure Theories to Account for Cyber Abuse Victimization.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 32(2): 169-188.
  • With the advent of the Internet and the emergence of cybercrimes (e.g., cyber stalking, cyber harassment), criminologists have begun to explore the empirical utility of lifestyle exposure and routine activity theories (RATs) to account for personal victimization as a consequence of cyber abuse. Available cyber abuse studies have produced inconsistent empirical support for both models, which has reignited the debate about whether terrestrial theories, such as RAT, will ever be able to adequately explain cybercrimes due to the spatial and temporal disconnect between the theories and the cyber environment. This article reviews existing cyber abuse scholarship, explores potential reasons for the weak empirical support for routine activity and lifestyle exposure theories in cyberspace, and proposes several directions for future research. We suggest that to further our understanding of cyber abuse processes, scholars need to carefully define and operationalize the key theoretical concepts in the light of latest developments in RAT (i.e., addition of new controllers?handlers and place managers, and super controllers), and conduct in-depth qualitative studies, as well as quantitative studies, that employ robust methodological designs and multi-level statistical analyses.
  • Visser, M. M., et al. (2015). “The effects of parental components in a trauma-focused cognitive behavioral based therapy for children exposed to interparental violence: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.” BMC Psychiatry 15(1): 131.
  • Interparental violence is both common and harmful and impacts children’s lives directly and indirectly. Direct effects refer to affective, behavioral, and cognitive responses to interparental violence and psychosocial adjustment. Indirect effects refer to deteriorated parental availability and parent-child interaction. Standard Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy may be insufficient for children traumatized by exposure to interparental violence, given the pervasive impact of interparental violence on the family system. HORIZON is a trauma focused cognitive behavioral therapy based group program with the added component of a preparatory parenting program aimed at improving parental availability; and the added component of parent-child sessions to improve parent-child interaction.
  • Widom, C. S. and H. W. Wilson (2015). Intergenerational Transmission of Violence. Violence and Mental Health: 27-45.

2014

(Ademi, Killias et al. 2014, AM. 2014, Asatryan 2014, Bachman and Schutt 2014, Barnes 2014, Beato and Silveira 2014, Bersani 2014, Bersani, Loughran et al. 2014, Bezić 2014, Bezić 2014, Bezić 2014, Bezić 2014, Bezić and Getoš Kalac 2014, Blum 2014, Body-Gendrot 2014, Bruinsma and Weisburd 2014, Canter 2014, Chang and Ren 2014, Cities 2014, Clay-Warner 2014, Craig, Diamond et al. 2014, Craig 2014, Dias, Conde et al. 2014, Dias 2014, Ellis, Abdi et al. 2014, Elonheimo 2014, Enzmann 2014, Farrall, B et al. 2014, Farren 2014, Farren 2014, Forrest 2014, Gallupe and Baron 2014, Gatti, Fossa et al. 2014, Gavray 2014, Gavray 2014, Genty, Adedoyin et al. 2014, George 2014, Getos and Bezić 2014, Gilman, Hill et al. 2014, Goldman, Giles et al. 2014, Greenwood 2014, Hardman 2014, Harkness and Hitlin 2014, Haymoz and Gatti 2014, Haymoz, Maxson et al. 2014, Herlitz, Farren et al. 2014, Hofmann, Wisneski et al. 2014, Hughes, Bellis et al. 2014, Jo and Bouffard 2014, Kalpokas and Mickevič 2014, Kangaspunta and Marshall 2014, Kask and Markina 2014, Killias and Lukash 2014, Killias and Lukash 2014, Kivivuori, Salmi et al. 2014, Krajewski 2014, Lansford, Sharma et al. 2014, Leverentz 2014, Levy 2014, Lukash 2014, Lukash and Killias 2014, Lukash and Killias 2014, Lukash, Killias et al. 2014, Madigan, Stang et al. 2014, Maljevic 2014, Maljević, Muftić et al. 2014, Maniglio and Innamorati 2014, Markina 2014, Marshall 2014, Marshall 2014, Marshall and Enzmann 2014, Marshall and Enzmann 2014, Marshall and Marshall 2014, Marshall and Marshall 2014, Mazák 2014, Messner 2014, Mickevič 2014, Minkov 2014, Moravcova 2014, Moravcová 2014, Moravcová 2014, Moravcová 2014, Moravcová and Podaná 2014, Morillo 2014, Muftić, Grubb et al. 2014, Musgrave and Wilcox 2014, Neissl 2014, Nelken 2014, Organization 2014, Pauwels and Gavray 2014, Piquero, Schubert et al. 2014, Piquero, Schubert et al. 2014, Podaná and Enzmann 2014, Posick 2014, Ren and Marshall 2014, Ren and Marshall 2014, Rocca, Verde et al. 2014, Rocca, Verde et al. 2014, Rocque, Posick et al. 2014, Rogers 2014, Röschová 2014, Ruggiero 2014, Saucier, Kenner et al. 2014, Scheff 2014, Simons and Barr 2014, Skardhamar, Monsbakken et al. 2014, Skardhamar and Savolainen 2014, Snacken, Bauwens et al. 2014, Soellner, Göbel et al. 2014, Stets and Turner 2014, Stevkovic, Nikolic-Ristanovic et al. 2014, Strohschein and Matthew 2014, Theobald, Farrington et al. 2014, United Nations Children’s Fund 2014, van der Gaag and Steketee 2014, Ward, Fox et al. 2014, Webb 2014, Wiecko 2014, Wikström 2014, Wood 2014, Wooditch, Tang et al. 2014)

  • Ademi, M., et al. (2014). First results of ISRD-3 in Kosovo. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • , L. (2014). The Ex-Prisoner’s Dilemma: How Women Negotiate Competing Narratives ofReentry and Desistance. New Brunswick, NJ, Rutgers Univ. Press.
  • Asatryan, S. (2014). Delinquency in the Republic of Armenia, Yerevan State University. A. Thesis.
  • Bachman, R. and R. K. Schutt (2014). The Practice of Research in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Los Angeles, Sage.
  • Barnes, J. C. (2014). “Catching the bad guys: An assessment of the efficacy of the U.S. criminal justice system.” Journal of Criminal Justice 42: 338 – 346.
  • Beato, C. and A. M. Silveira (2014). “Effectiveness and Evaluation of Crime Prevention Programs in Minas Gerais.” Stability: International Journal of Security & Development 3(1): 20.
  • Bersani, B. E. (2014). “An Examination of First and Second Generation Immigrant Offending Trajectories.” Justice Quarterly 31(2): 315-343.
  • Bersani, B. E., et al. (2014). “Comparing patterns and predictors of immigrant offending among a sample of adjudicated youth.” J Youth Adolesc 43(11): 1914-1933.
  • Research on immigration and crime has only recently started to consider potential heterogeneity in longitudinal patterns of immigrant offending. Guided by segmented assimilation and life course criminology frameworks, this article advances prior research on the immigration-crime nexus in three ways: using a large sample of high-risk adjudicated youth containing first and second generation immigrants; examining longitudinal trajectories of official and self-reported offending; and merging segmented assimilation and life course theories to distinguish between offending patterns. Data come from the Pathways to Desistance study containing detailed offending and socio-demographic background information on 1,354 adolescents (13.6 % female; n = 1,061 native-born; n = 210 second generation immigrants; n = 83 first generation immigrants) as they transition to young adulthood (aged 14-17 at baseline). Over 84 months we observe whether patterns of offending, and the correlates that may distinguish them, operate differently across immigrant generations. Collectively, this study offers the first investigation of whether immigrants, conditioned on being adjudicated, are characterized by persistent offending. Results show that first generation immigrants are less likely to be involved in serious offending and to evidence persistence in offending, and appear to be on a path toward desistance much more quickly than their peers. Further, assimilation and neighborhood disadvantage operate in unique ways across generational status and relate to different offending styles. The findings show that the risk for persistent offending is greatest among those with high levels of assimilation who reside in disadvantaged contexts, particularly among the second generation youth in the sample.
  • Bezić, R. (2014). Child and Juvenile Delinquency in Croatia. 1st Annual Conference of the Max Planck Partner Group for Balkan Criminology: “Mapping the Criminological Landscape of the Balkans”. Zagreb, Croatia.
  • Bezić, R. (2014). Juvenile Delinquency in the Balkans: A Regional Comparative Analysis based on the ISRD-3 Study Findings. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Bezić, R. (2014). Juvenile Delinquency in the Balkans: A Regional Comparative Analysis of the ISRD3. ‘Balkan Criminology’ One-Week Intensive Course. Dubrovnik, Croatia.
  • Bezić, R. (2014). Juvenile Delinquency in the Balkans: A Regional Comparative Analysis of the ISRD3-Study Findings. Mapping the Criminological Landscape of the Balkans: A Survey on Criminology and Crime with an Expedition into the Criminal Landscape of the Balkans. A.-M. Getoš Kalac, H.-J. Albrecht and M. Kilchling. Berlin, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e.V. & University of Zagreb – Faculty of Law in coop. with Duncker & Humblot: 429-447.
  • Bezić, R. and A.-M. Getoš Kalac (2014). ISRD3 Croatia. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Blum, L. (2014). “Three educational values for a multicultural society: Difference recognition, national cohesion and equality.” Journal of Moral Education 43(3): 332-344.
  • Body-Gendrot, S. (2014). Place, space and urban (in)security. The Routledge Handbook of European Criminology. S. Body-Gendrot, M. Hough, K. Kerezsi, D. Levy and S. Snacken, Routledge.
  • Bruinsma, G. and D. Weisburd (2014). Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice.
  • Canter, D. (2014).
  • Chang, S. and L. Ren (2014). Self-Control, Social Bonds, and Juvenile Victimization: Testing the General Theory of Crime in China. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Cities, T. G. N. o. S. (2014). 100 PROMISING PRACTICES ON SAFER CITIES: Collation of Urban Safety Practices Work in progress, International Center for the Prevention of Crime.
  • Clay-Warner, J. (2014). Crime and Emotions. Handbook of the Sociology of Emotions: Volume II. J. E. Stets and J. H. Turner. Dordrecht, Springer Netherlands: 473-493.
  • There is considerable scholarly interest in emotions as both a precursor to criminal behavior and as a response to experienced or anticipated criminal victimization. The purpose of this chapter is to review the literature on emotions and crime with a focus on three substantive areas: (1) the role of emotions in the major crime theories; (2) the role of emotions in theories of desistance; and (3) fear of crime. In doing so, this review highlights areas of intersection between sociological theories of emotion and theories of crime and also suggests opportunities for greater communication and collaboration between criminologists and emotion scholars.
  • Craig, J., et al. (2014). Marriage as an intervention in the lives of criminal offenders. Effective Interventions in the Lives of Criminal Offenders. J. A. Humphrey and C. P. New York, Springer: 19-37.
  • Craig, J. M. (2014). “The effects of marriage and parenthood on offending levels over time among juvenile offenders across race and ethnicity.” Journal of Crime and Justice 38(2): 1-20.
  • In criminal careers research, reasons why offenders stop offending are of importance. This study tests Sampson and Laub’s age-graded theory of informal social control using a nationally representative contemporaneous sample and explores two possible turning points in the life course of individuals that could lead to desistance: marriage and parenthood. Racial and ethnic differences in the impact of these social bonds are also analyzed. In mixed support of the theory, marriage is found to lead to changes in levels of offending among whites and Hispanics but not blacks. Parenthood leads to decreases in offending among whites but not blacks or Hispanics. These results suggest possible modifications are needed to Sampson and Laub’s theory. A discussion of these findings is presented.
  • Dias, J., et al. (2014). “International Self-Report Delinquency (ISRD3): Tradução e Adaptação ao Contexto Cabo-Verdiano.” Revista de Psicología 20(2): 335-351.
  • Dias, J. J. (2014). Activity Report. International Self-Report Delinquency ISRD-3 in Cape Verde, Universidade Cabo Verde, University of Minho: 1-7.
  • Ellis, B. H., et al. (2014). “Trauma and Openness to Legal and Illegal Activism Among Somali Refugees.” Terrorism and Political Violence 27(5): 857-883.
  • Elonheimo, H. (2014). “Evidence for the crime drop: survey findings from two Finnish cities between 1992 and 2013.” Journal of Scandinavian Studies in Criminology and Crime Prevention published online 30 July 2014.
  • Enzmann, D. (2014). Incidence based reporting rates: Methodological and substantive issues in cross-national research. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Farrall, S., et al. (2014). Criminal Careers in Transition. The Social context of Desistance from Crime. New York, Oxford University Press.
  • Farren, D. (2014). Violence and self-control: a dual-process perspective. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Farren, D. (2014). Violence, Self-Control and Morality: A Dual-System Perspective, Universität zu Köln. Sc.
  • Forrest, W. (2014). “Cohabitation, Relationship Quality, and Desistance From Crime.” Journal of Marriage and Family 76(3): 539-556.
  • Although the empirical links between marriage and desistance are well established, very little is known about the degree to which cohabitation is associated with changes in criminal behavior. This is a significant oversight given that, among some segments of the population, cohabitation has become more common than marriage. In this article, the author investigated the links between cohabitation and desistance from crime. In doing so, particular attention was paid to the possibility that similarities between the apparent effects of marriage and cohabitation are obscured by variations in relationship quality and the increasing tendency for cohabitation to precede marriage. Analyses based on the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 ( = 3,232) indicate that cohabitation is associated with reductions in the rate of property and drug offending, but not the termination of violent, property, or drug offending. By contrast, marriage is consistently associated with large reductions in the rate of offending across the 3 crime categories as well as the abandonment of those crimes. These results provide greater insight into the links between adult family relationships, such as cohabitation and marriage, and desistance from crime.
  • Gallupe, O. and S. Baron (2014). “Morality, Self-Control, Deterrence, and Drug Use.” Crime & Delinquency 60(2): 284-305.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2014). Comparing ISRD-2 and ISRD-3: methodological problems and first results in Italy. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Gavray, C. (2014). How does gender socialisation influence teenagers’ behaviors? Contribution of ISRD-2 and ISRD-3 to this question. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Gavray, C. (2014). The temptation to use violence: what kinds of effec on feelings of discrimination and victimisation? 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Genty, N., et al. (2014). “Does religion matter? A study of the impact of religion on female incarcerated gang members in a bible belt state.” Journal of Gang Research 21(2): 1-16.
  • George, L. (2014). “Taking Time Seriously.” Journal of Health and Social Behavior 55(3): 251-264.
  • Getos, A.-M. and R. Bezić (2014). ISRD3 Results from Croatia. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Gilman, A. B., et al. (2014). “Understanding the relationship between self-reported offending and official criminal charges across early adulthood.” Criminal Behavior and Mental Health 24: 229 – 240.
  • Goldman, L., et al. (2014). “Going to extremes: Social identity and communication processes associated with gang membership.” Group Processes & Intergroup Relations 17(6): 813-832.
  • Greenwood, P. (2014). Evidence-Based Practice in Juvenile Justice. Progress, Challenges, and Opportunities. New York, Springer.
  • Hardman, E. L. (2014). “What Are They Thinking? The Moral Judgment of Children With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.” Remedial and Special Education 36(3): 143-153.
  • Harkness, S. K. and S. Hitlin (2014). Morality and Emotions. Handbook of the Sociology of Emotions: Volume II. J. E. Stets and J. H. Turner. Dordrecht, Springer Netherlands: 451-471.
  • Sociologists have long considered morality to be a core aspect of social life, though direct interest in the topic has waxed and waned in the past century. Research in this area has been increasing over the past decade, however, especially as cognitive disciplines highlight the importance of emotions for understanding moral development, moral action, and the power of moral codes to circumscribe individual functioning. This chapter summarizes these parallel bodies of work as they can inform sociological understanding of emotions and their cultural milieu. We begin with a brief overview of the extant research on the role emotions play in cognitive processing and decision making. We then discuss the universality and cultural specificity of moral emotions before tracing arguments about the cultural moral systems that, often implicitly, shape individual moral feeling, and conclude with a call for more sociological research on the cultural facets of moral emotions.
  • Haymoz, S. and U. Gatti (2014). Deviant behavior and victimization among gang members: international comparisons on gender differences. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Haymoz, S., et al. (2014). “Street gang participation in Europe: A comparison of correlates.” European Journal of Criminology 11(6): 659-681.
  • Herlitz, L., et al. (2014). Overview of the Understanding and Preventing Youth Crime Study (UPYC): A Comparative Study in France, Germany, the Netherlands, the UK and the US. Poster presentation. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Hofmann, W., et al. (2014). “Morality in everyday life.” Science 12 SEPTEMBER 2014 • VOL 345 I(6202): 1340-1343.
  • Hughes, K., et al. (2014). “Global development and diffusion of outcome evaluation research for interpersonal and self-directed violence prevention from 2007 to 2013: A systematic review.” Aggression and Violent Behavior 19(6): 655-662.
  • Through a global review, we identified gaps in the geographical distribution of violence prevention evidence
  • outcome evaluation studies and the types of violence addressed. Systematic literature searches identified 355
  • articles published between 2007 and 2013 that evaluated programs to prevent interpersonal or self-directed
  • violence; focused on universal or selected populations; and reported outcomes measuring violence or closely
  • related risk factors. The number of studies identified increased annually from 2008 (n = 37), reaching 64 in
  • Over half (n = 203) of all studies focused on youth violence yet only one on elder maltreatment. Study
  • characteristics varied by year and violence type. Only 9.3% of all studies had been conducted in LMICs. These studies
  • were less likely than those in high income countries (HICs) to have tested established interventions yetmore likely
  • to involve international collaboration. Evaluation studies successfully established in LMIC had often capitalized on
  • other major regional priorities (e.g. HIV). Relationships between violence and social determinants, communicable
  • and non-communicable diseases, and even economic prosperity should be explored asmechanisms to increase the
  • global reach of violence prevention research. Results should inform future research strategies and provide a
  • baseline for measuring progress in developing the violence prevention evidence-base, especially in LMICs.
  • © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license
  • Jo, Y. and L. Bouffard (2014). “Stability of self-control and gender.” Journal of Criminal Justice 42(4): 356-365.
  • Kalpokas, V. and A. Mickevič (2014). 12-15 metų amžiaus moksleivių delinkvencinio elgesio ir viktimologinės apklausos (ISRD-3) metodologiniai aspektai: kas matuojama, klausimyno adaptavimo Lietuvoje problemos. Lithuanian Law Institute seminar. Vilnius.
  • Kangaspunta, K. and I. H. Marshall (2014). Surveys on violence against Women. Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. G. Bruinsma and D. Weisburd. New York, Springer: 5104-5117.
  • Kask, K. and A. Markina (2014). “With Whom Did You Drink Last Time? An Analysis of Adolescents’ Alcohol Use.” Annual Research & Review in Biology 4(1): 174-187.
  • Killias, M. and A. Lukash (2014). International Self-Reported Delinquency Survey (ISRD-3): Erste Ergebnisse für die Schweiz. Netzwerktreffen “Gewaltprävention”. Aarau, Switzerland.
  • Killias, M. and A. Lukash (2014). “Keine Entwarnung: Jugenddelinquenz sinkt nicht.” ZLV Magazin 5(Oktober 2014): 18-19.
  • Kivivuori, J., et al. (2014). International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD3) in Finland: Technical Report. Research Brief 39. Helsinki, National Research Institute of Legal Policy: 1-9.
  • Krajewski, K. (2014). Drugs legislation: European drug policies or drug policies in Europe? The Routledge Handbook of European Criminology. S. Body-Gendrot, M. Hough, K. Kerezsi, R. Levy and S. Snacken. London and New York, Routledge.
  • Lansford, J. E., et al. (2014). “Corporal punishment, maternal warmth, and child adjustment: A longitudinal study in eight countries.” Journal of Clinical Child Adolescent Psychology 43(4): 670-685.
  • Leverentz, A. M. (2014). The ex-prisoner’s dilemma : how women negotiate competing narratives of reentry and desistance, New Brunswick, New Jersey
  • London, England : Rutger University Press.
  • Levy, R. (2014). Police and policing in Europe. Centralization, pluralization, Europeanization. The Routledge Handbook of European Criminology. S. Body-Gendrot, M. Hough, K. Kerezsi, R. Levy and S. Snacken, Routledge.
  • Lukash, A. (2014). Die ISRD-3 Umfrage in der Schweiz (1992, 2006 und 2013), und in einigen Balkanländern (Kosovo, Serbien, ev. weitere). Kolloquiums der Südwestdeutschen und Schweizerischen Kriminologischen Institute. Freiburg, Germany.
  • Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2014). First Results of ISRD-3 in Switzerland. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2014). Results of International Self-Report Delinquency studies (ISRD-3) in Switzerland, Kosovo, Serbia and Ukraine. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Lukash, A., et al. (2014). First results of ISRD-3 in Ukraine. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Madigan, D., et al. (2014). “A Systematic Statistical Approach to Evaluating Evidence from Observational Studies.” Annual Review of Statistics and Its Application 1(1): 11-39.
  • Threats to the validity of observational studies on the effects of interventions raise questions about the appropriate role of such studies in decision making. Nonetheless, scholarly journals in fields such as medicine, education, and the social sciences feature many such studies, often with limited exploration of these threats, and the lay press is rife with news stories based on these studies. Consumers of these studies rely on the expertise of the study authors to conduct appropriate analyses, and on the thoroughness of the scientific peer-review process to check the validity, but the introspective and ad hoc nature of the design of these analyses appears to elude any meaningful objective assessment of their performance. Here, we review some of the challenges encountered in observational studies and review an alternative, data-driven approach to observational study design, execution, and analysis. Although much work remains, we believe this research direction shows promise.
  • Maljevic, A. (2014). First results of ISRD-3 in Bosnia-Herzegovina. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Maljević, A., et al. (2014). “Does low self-control predicts juvenile delinquency among nationally representative sample of Bosnian adolescents?” Criminal Justice Issues XIV(2014): 5-6.
  • Maniglio, R. and M. Innamorati (2014). “Psychosocial Correlates of Adolescent Cannabis Use: Data from the Italian Subsample of the Second International Self-Reported Delinquency Study.” Journal of Addictive Diseases 33(3): 210-220.
  • Markina, A. (2014). To beat or not to beat: how physical punishment influences children’s behavior. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Marshall, C. E. (2014). Does size matter? Comparing delinquency and victimization in a cross-national sample of small town vs. big city youth. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Marshall, I. H. (2014). The International Self-Report Delinquency Project. Poster presentation. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. Enzmann (2014). Testing the invariance hypothesis of interaction between self-control and opportunities: Results of cross-national analysis of samples of youth. 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, San Francisco, CA, American Society of Criminology.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. Enzmann (2014). Testing the invariance hypothesis of interaction between self-control and opportunities: Results of cross-national analysis of samples of youth. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Marshall, I. H. and C. Marshall (2014). Changes in self-reported delinquency in 9 Western countries (1991 and 2007): comparison of the first and second sweep of the ISRD. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Marshall, I. H. and C. E. Marshall (2014). Changes in self-reported delinquency in 9 Western countries (1991 and 2007): Comparison of the first and second sweep of the ISRD. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Prague, Czech Republic, European Society of Criminology.
  • Mazák, J. (2014). Delikvence a škola: část předběžných výsledků z mezinárodní „self-reportové“ studie delikvence mládeže ISRD-3. kriminologické dny. S. Roman and J. Kříha. České Budějovice, Česká kriminologická společnost: 140-146.
  • Messner, S. F. (2014). “Social Institutions, Theory Development, and the Promise of Comparative Criminological Research.” Asian Journal of Criminology 9(1): 49-63.
  • This paper highlights the ways in which recent comparative criminological research has begun to advance theory development by directing systematic attention to the role of institutional structure. The overarching thesis is that sensitivity to the institutional context in recent criminological studies, especially those conducted in Asia, has paved the way for the productive elaboration of two highly influential theories: Routine Activities Theory and the General Theory of Crime (or self-control theory). Such theoretical elaboration promises to enhance the explanatory power of these theories by placing individual behavior in a multilevel, institutional context. The paper also outlines a transformed variant of self-control theory that posits two distinctive forms of self-control, which are likely to have differential impacts on criminal offending depending on features of the institutional structure of societies.
  • Mickevič, A. (2014). ISRD-3 Survey in Lithuania: Preliminary Results and Insights. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Minkov, M. (2014). Cross-Cultural Analysis: The Science and Art of Comparing the World’s Modern Societies and Their Cultures. Thousand Oaks, California.
  • Moravcova, E. (2014). Patterns of spending leisure time and contact with delinquent friends as an important predictor of juvenile delinquency: Results of ISRD research. 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, San Francisco, CA, American Society of Criminology.
  • Moravcová, E. (2014). “Methodological Aspects of Gang Membership: the Case of the Czech Republic.” Acta Universitatis Carolinae Philosophica et Historica 2: 69-83.
  • Moravcová, E. (2014). Patterns of spending leisure time and contact with delinquent friends as an important predictor of juvenile delinquency: results of ISRD research. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Moravcová, E. (2014). Risky behavior, delinquent friends, delinquency and victimization in the Czech Republic. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Moravcová, E. and Z. Podaná (2014). “Juvenile Delinquency in the Czech Republic: First Results of the ISRD-3 Self-Report Survey.” Acta Universitatis Carolinae Philosophica et Historica 2: 57-68.
  • Morillo, S. (2014). Conductas Antisociales Autoreveladas en Estudiantes Adolescentes: La Escuela, la Familia y los Amigos., Universidad de Los Andes, Venezuela.
  • Muftić, L. R., et al. (2014). “The Impact of Life Domains on Juvenile Offending in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Direct, Indirect, and Moderating Effects in Agnew’s Integrated General Theory.” Journal of Research in Crime & Delinquency 51(6): 816-845.
  • Musgrave, p. and C. Wilcox (2014). The highs and lows of support for marijuana legalization among white Americans.
  • Neissl, K. (2014). Overview of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD). Poster presentation. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Nelken, D. (2014). Globalisation and criminal justice trends in Italy. The Routledge Hanbook of European Criminology. S. Body-Gendrot, M. Hough, K. Kerezsi, D. Levy and S. Snacken, Routledge.
  • Organization, W. H. (2014). Global status report on violence prevention 2014.
  • Pauwels, L. and C. Gavray (2014). Comment un contexte scolaire concentrant des élèves accumulant des vulnérabilités, désavantages et discriminations se voit-il affecter le comportement de ces mêmes jeunes ? Un test multi-niveaux des effets transversaux intermédiaires – Illustration au départ des données ISRD-2. 14ème congrès de l’Association Internationale des Criminologues de Langue Française (AICLF). Liège.
  • Piquero, A., et al. (2014). “Comparing official and self-report records of offending across gender and race/ethnicity in a longitudinal study of serious youthful offenders.” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 51: 526 – 556.
  • Piquero, A. R., et al. (2014). “Comparing Official and Self-report Records of Offending across Gender and Race/Ethnicity in a Longitudinal Study of Serious Youthful Offenders.” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 51(4): 526-556.
  • Podaná, Z. and D. Enzmann (2014). Trends of Youth Violence in Five European Countries. Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research. A. C. Michalos. New York, Springer: 6739-6742.
  • Posick, C. (2014). On the General Relationship between Victimization and Offending: Examining Cultural Contigencies. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Ren, L. and I. H. Marshall (2014). Testing the measurement invariance hypothesis of Grasmick et al. (1993) self-control scale using the ISRD2 data. 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, San Francisco, CA, American Society of Criminology.
  • Ren, L. and I. H. Marshall (2014). Testing the measurement invariance hypothesis of Grasmick et al. (1993) self-control scale using the ISRD2 data. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Rocca, G., et al. (2014). “Alcohol use, delinquency and victimization among juveniles in Europe: Results from an international multi-centric study (ISRD-2).” 8: 18-29 %J Italian Journal of Criminology.
  • Rocca, G., et al. (2014). “Uso di alcol, delinquenza e vittimizzazione tra i giovani in Europa: Analisi preliminare dei risultati di una ricerca multicentrica internazionale (ISRD-2).” Rassegna Italiana di Criminologia 1: 18-29.
  • Rocque, M., et al. (2014). “Identities Through Time: An Exploration of Identity Change as a Cause of Desistance.” Justice Quarterly 33(1): 45-72.
  • Rogers, P. (2014). Theory of Change. Methodological Briefs: Impact Evaluation 2. Florence, Italy, UNICEF Office of Research,.
  • Röschová, M. (2014). Crosswise model in a delinquency survey: how guessing answers interferes in prevalence estimates. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Ruggiero, V. (2014). Organnised and transnational crime in Europe. The Routledge Handbook of european Criminology. S. Body-Gendrot, M. Hough, K. Kerezsi, R. Levy and S. Snacken. New York, Routledge.
  • Saucier, G., et al. (2014). “Cross-Cultural Differences in a Global “Survey of World Views”.” Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology 46(1): 53-70.
  • Scheff, T. J. (2014). A Retrospective Look at Emotions. Handbook of the Sociology of Emotions: Volume II. J. E. Stets and J. H. Turner. Dordrecht, Springer Netherlands: 245-266.
  • This chapter is a summary and reconsideration of three of my study areas that focus on or at least involve emotions. The first concerns labeling theory. I didn’t realize then that the emotion of shame was an important component. The second area is my version of the theory of catharsis, an approach that has been mistakenly cast aside. The last aspect considers the pride-shame axis as a key part of a major social system, my current work. Theories by C. H. Cooley and Erving Goffman imply that shame, particularly, is all but ubiquitous in modern societies, yet usually invisible. My current ideas suggest that this conjecture may be somewhat overstated, if only slightly. However, empirical studies by Norbert Elias and by Helen Lewis imply support for both ubiquity and invisibility. Both the Elias/Lewis conjecture on hiding shame and Billig’s theory of repression are supported by my Ngram study of historical changes in frequency of shame terms in five languages. Like other emotions, such as fear, shame can be recursive, acting back on itself (shame about shame). Limitless recursion of shame may explain extreme cases of silence, and of shame/anger, violence. These propositions need further testing. For one thing, they may have implications not only for social science, but for society as a whole.
  • Simons, R. L. and A. B. Barr (2014). “Shifting Perspectives: Cognitive Changes Partially Mediate the Impact of Romantic Relationships on Desistance from Crime.” Justice Q 31(5): 793-821.
  • Although research regarding the impact of marriage on desistance is important, most romantic relationships during early adulthoood, the period in the life course when involvement in criminal offending is relatively high, do not involve marriage. Using the internal moderator approach, we tested hypotheses regarding the impact of non-marital romantic relationships on desistance using longitudinal data from a sample of approximately 600 African American young adults. The results largely supported the study hypotheses. We found no significant association between simply being in a romantic relationship and desistance from offending. On the other hand, for both males and females quality of romantic relationship was rather strongly associated with desistance. Partner antisociality only influenced the offending of females. Much of the effect of quality of romantic relationship on desistance was mediated by a reduction in commitment to a criminogenic knowledge structure (a hostile view of people and relationships, concern with immediate gratification, and cynical view of conduct norms). The mediating effect of change in affiliation with deviant peers was not significant once the contribution of criminogenic knowledge structure was taken into account. The findings are discussed in terms of social control and cognitive accounts of the mechanisms whereby romantic relationships influence desistance.
  • Skardhamar, T., et al. (2014). “Crime and the Transition to Marriage.” British Journal of Criminology 54(3): 411-427.
  • Influential perspectives in life course criminology maintain that marriage leads to desistance from crime, and the mechanisms are largely related to spousal social control. Whether and to what degree marriage represents a break from a criminal past might depend on the spouse’s criminal attitude. We study how changes in offending are related to marriage, and how the patterns vary by the wife’s criminal record. We use data from Norwegian administrative registers that cover the total population of all persons who married in Norway between 1997 and 2001 (N = 80,064). We use information on these persons’ criminal records in two five-year periods before and after marriage as well as information on their wives’ criminal records in the same period, to estimate the probability of offending across an 11-year period around the time of marriage. We do so in a way that takes premarital changes in criminal behaviour into account. We find that the desistance process tend to start up to several years before marriage, and that the decline is greater for those who marry a wife with a criminal record.
  • Skardhamar, T. and J. Savolainen (2014). “CHANGES IN CRIMINAL OFFENDING AROUND THE TIME OF JOB ENTRY: A STUDY OF EMPLOYMENT AND DESISTANCE.” Criminology 52(2): 263-291.
  • Does employment promote desistance from crime? Most perspectives assume that individuals who become employed are less likely to offend than those who do not. The critical issue has to do with the timing of employment transitions in the criminal trajectory. The turning point hypothesis expects reductions in offending after job entries, whereas the maturation perspective assumes desistance to have occurred ahead of successful transitions to legitimate work. Focusing on a sample of recidivist males who became employed during 2001–2006 (N = 783), smoothing spline regression techniques were used to model changes in criminal offending around the point of entry to stable employment. Consistent with the maturation perspective, the results showed that most offenders had desisted prior to the employment transition and that becoming employed was not associated with further reductions in criminal behavior. Consistent with the turning point hypothesis, we identified a subset of offenders who became employed during an active phase of the criminal career and experienced substantial reductions in criminal offending thereafter. However, this trajectory describes less than 2 percent of the sample. The patterns observed in this research suggest that transition to employment is best viewed as a consequence rather than as a cause of criminal desistance.
  • Snacken, S., et al. (2014). Prisons and punishment in Europe. The Routledge Handbook of European Criminology. S. Body-Gendrot, M. Hough, K. Kerezsi, R. Levy and S. Snacken.
  • Soellner, R., et al. (2014). “Alcohol use of adolescents from 25 European countries.” Journal of Public Health 22(1): 57-65.
  • Stets, J. E. and J. H. Turner, Eds. (2014). Handbook of the Sociology of Emotions Volume II. Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research, Springer.
  • Stevkovic, L., et al. (2014). First results of ISRD-3 in Serbia. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Strohschein, L. and A. Matthew (2014). “Adolescent Problem Behavior in Toronto, Canada. Associations with Family, School, and Neighborhood Social Capital.” Sociological Inquiry Early view, article first published online 14 June 2014: 1-19.
  • Theobald, D., et al. (2014). “Scaling up from convictions to self-report offending.” Criminal Behavior and Mental Health 24: 265 – 276.
  • United Nations Children’s Fund (2014). Hidden in plain sight: A statistical analysis of violence against children. New York.
  • van der Gaag, R. and M. Steketee (2014). Developmental risk and protective factors and youth delinquency: implications for prevention. 14th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Prague.
  • Ward, J. T., et al. (2014). “Gender, Low Self-Control, and Violent Victimization.” Deviant Behavior 36(2): 113-129.
  • Webb, P. (2014). “Black men, invisibility and crime: towards a critical race theory of desistance , by Martin Glynn.” Global Crime 15(3-4): 1-4.
  • Wiecko, F. M. (2014). “Late onset offending: Fact or fiction.” International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 58: 107 – 129.
  • Wikström, P.-O. H. (2014). Situational Action Theory. Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. G. Bruinsma and D. Weisburd. New York, NY, Springer New York: 4845-4852.
  • Wood, J. L. (2014). “Understanding gang membership: The significance of group processes.” Group Processes & Intergroup Relations 17(6): 710-729.
  • Wooditch, A., et al. (2014). “Which Criminogenic Need Changes Are Most Important in Promoting Desistance from Crime and Substance Use?” Crim Justice Behav 41(3): 276-299.
  • Andrews and Bonta identified the following criminogenic needs as important to reducing offending: substance use, antisocial cognition, antisocial associates, family and marital relations, employment, and leisure and recreational activities. This study examines dynamic criminogenic need changes across a 12-month period and identifies which need changes are the best predictors of criminal offending and illicit drug use among a sample of drug-involved probationers who participated in an intervention (N = 251). Probationers had significant changes in several need areas, and treatment participation moderated some changes. Probationers who had reductions in criminally involved family members they associate with, improved work performance, and decreased alcohol use had the greatest reductions in offending. Those who increased time spent engaged in leisure and recreational activities were less likely to self-report subsequent drug use. These findings suggest that certain dynamic need changes may be more important than others, and designing interventions to impact these needs might improve outcomes.

2013

((?) 2013, Aas 2013, Aas 2013, Administration 2013, Administration 2013, Aliverti 2013, Aussems, Steketee et al. 2013, Barker 2013, Baskin and Sommers 2013, Beaver, DeLisi et al. 2013, Beckley 2013, Bersani and Doherty 2013, Berten, Cardoen et al. 2013, Berten and Vettenburg 2013, Berten and Vettenburg 2013, Berten and Vettenburg 2013, Berten, Vettenburg et al. 2013, Bräker, Göbel et al. 2013, Bräker, Göbel et al. 2013, Brown, Esbensen et al. 2013, Buckle and Walsh 2013, C 2013, Castro, Cardoso et al. 2013, Costa 2013, Covaleskie 2013, Craig and Foster 2013, Cullen and Wilcox 2013, Diener, Oishi et al. 2013, Dixon 2013, Eisner and Malti 2013, Ellonen, Piispa et al. 2013, Enzmann 2013, Enzmann and Kivivuori 2013, Enzmann and Marshall 2013, Enzmann and Marshall 2013, Farrington, Piquero et al. 2013, Foster and Brooks-Gunn 2013, Fraser 2013, Garland 2013, Gatti and Rocca 2013, Gatti, Rocca et al. 2013, Gatti, Soellner et al. 2013, Gatti, Soellner et al. 2013, Gavray, Vettenburg et al. 2013, General 2013, George 2013, Getoš and Bezić 2013, Gibson and Krohn 2013, Glynn 2013, Group 2013, Haymoz and Gatti 2013, Haymoz and Gatti 2013, Haymoz and Gatti 2013, Heinrichs, Oser et al. 2013, Heinrichs, Oser et al. 2013, Higginson, Mazerolle et al. 2013, Hitlin and Vaisey 2013, Hofmann, Luhmann et al. 2013, Holdaway 2013, Hough 2013, Jonkman, van den Toorn et al. 2013, Kapardis 2013, Kapardis 2013, Kask, Markina et al. 2013, Kask, Markina et al. 2013, Keefe 2013, Killias and Lukash 2013, Kivivuori, Salmi et al. 2013, Koopmans 2013, Kruttschnitt 2013, Lahlah, Lens et al. 2013, Lee and Laidler 2013, Liu, Hebenton et al. 2013, Liu, Hebenton et al. 2013, Longazel and Fleury-Steiner 2013, Lu, Yu et al. 2013, Lu, Yu et al. 2013, Lukash, Chattoraj et al. 2013, Lukash and Killias 2013, Lukash and Killias 2013, M, DJ et al. 2013, Malti, Keller et al. 2013, Manchak, Henderson et al. 2013, Markina and Kask 2013, Markina and Kask 2013, Marshall 2013, Marshall and Marshall 2013, Marshall and Marshall 2013, Marshall and Boutellier 2013, Marshall 2013, Marshall and Boutellier 2013, Marshall, Enzmann et al. 2013, Marshall, Enzmann et al. 2013, Marshall, Enzmann et al. 2013, Marshall and Maljevic 2013, Marshall and Maljevic 2013, Marshall and Maljević 2013, Masyn 2013, McConnachie 2013, Moestue, Moestue et al. 2013, Moravcová 2013, Moravcová, Podaná et al. 2013, Morillo, Birkbeck et al. 2013, Nowak 2013, Owens, Su et al. 2013, Pacula and Sevigny 2013, Pedersen 2013, Pierotti 2013, Podaná and Buriánek 2013, Podaná and Buriánek 2013, Podaná and Buriánek 2013, Posick 2013, Posick 2013, Reed, Lawrence et al. 2013, Ren, Zhao et al. 2013, Roberts and Chen 2013, Rocca, Verde et al. 2013, Ryo 2013, Scheithauer, Göbel et al. 2013, Sikkink and Kim 2013, Simpson 2013, Spini, Elcheroth et al. 2013, Steketee, Aussems et al. 2013, Steketee, Aussems et al. 2013, Steketee, Berten et al. 2013, Steketee and Jonkman 2013, Steketee, Jonkman et al. 2013, Steketee and Junger-Tas 2013, Steketee, Junger et al. 2013, Steketee and van den Toorn 2013, Sweeten, Pyrooz et al. 2013, Taefi 2013, Tankebe and Liebling 2013, Tate, Taylor et al. 2013, Thoma, Derryberry et al. 2013, Tuller and Marshall 2013, Tuller and Marshall 2013, United Nations 2013, van den Toorn, Jonkman et al. 2013, van den Toorn, Steketee et al. 2013, Van Kesteren, Dijk et al. 2013, Vettenburg, Brondeel et al. 2013, Veysey, DJ et al. 2013, Whelan 2013, Wright and Fagan 2013)

  • Aas, F. K. (2013). Globalization&Crime. Thousand Oaks, Cal., Sage.
  • Aas, K. (2013). Globalization and Crime, Sage.
  • Administration, D. E. (2013). The dangers and consequences of marijuana abuse. D. o. Justice. Washington D.C.
  • Administration, D. E. (2013). Successes in the fight against drugs. O. o. P. Affairs. Washington D.C.
  • Aliverti, A. (2013). “Book review: Bridget Anderson, Us & Them? The Dangerous Politics of Immigration Control.” Theoretical Criminology 17(3): 424-427.
  • Aussems, C., et al. (2013). Testing the cross national influences of the risk and protective factors and national characteristics on the drinking pattern of juveniles. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 265-276.
  • Barker, V. (2013). “Nordic Exceptionalism revisited: Explaining the paradox of a Janus-faced penal regime.” Theoretical Criminology 17(1): 5-25.
  • Nordic penal regimes are Janus-faced: one side relatively mild and benign; the other intrusive, disciplining and oppressive. This paradox has not been fully grasped or explained by the Nordic Exceptionalism thesis which overstates the degree to which Nordic penal order is based on humaneness and social solidarity, an antidote to mass incarceration. This essay examines the split in the foundation of the Swedish welfare state: it simultaneously promotes individual well-being in the social sphere but enables intrusive deprivations of liberty and in some cases, violates the principles of human rights. The backbone of the welfare state, Folkhemmet, the People’s Home, is at once demos, democratic and egalitarian and ethnos, a people by blood, exclusionary and essentialist. The lack of individual rights and an ethno-cultural conception of citizenship make certain categories of people such as criminal offenders, criminal aliens, drug offenders and perceived ‘others’, particularly foreign nationals, vulnerable to deprivation and exclusion.
  • Baskin, D. and I. Sommers (2013). “Exposure to Community Violence and Trajectories of Violent Offending.” Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 12(4): 367-385.
  • Beaver, K. M., et al. (2013). “No evidence of racial discrimination in criminal justice processing: Results from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.” Personality and Individual Differences 55: 29 – 34.
  • Beckley, A. (2013). “Correlates of war? Towards an understanding of nativity-based variation in immigrant offending.” European Journal of Criminology 10(4): 408-423.
  • Bersani, B. E. and E. E. Doherty (2013). “WHEN THE TIES THAT BIND UNWIND: EXAMINING THE ENDURING AND SITUATIONAL PROCESSES OF CHANGE BEHIND THE MARRIAGE EFFECT.” Criminology 51(2): 399-433.
  • Despite the continued growth of research demonstrating that marriage promotes desistance from crime, efforts aimed at understanding the mechanisms driving this effect are limited. Several theories propose to explain why we observe a reduction in offending after marriage including identity changes, strengthened attachments, reduced opportunities, and changes to routine activities. Although mechanisms are hard to measure, we argue that each proposed mechanism implies a specific change process, that is, whether the change that ensues after marriage is enduring (stable) or situational (temporary). Drawing on a medical model framework, we cast the role of marriage as a treatment condition and observe whether the effect of marriage is conditional on staying married or whether the effect persists when the “treatment” is taken away (i.e., divorce). We use 13 years of monthly level data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY97), a nationally representative sample containing close to 3,000 individuals with an arrest history, to examine changes in relationship status and arrest from adolescence into young adulthood. Estimates from multilevel within‐individual models reveal greater support for situational mechanisms in that divorce is detrimental particularly for those in longer marriages yet they also reveal important caveats that suggest a closer examination of the marriage effect. This research adds to the growing body of knowledge regarding the marriage effect by redirecting desistance research away from asking if marriage matters to asking how marriage affects desistance. A better understanding of this change process has important implications for criminal justice policy.
  • Berten, H., et al. (2013). “Alcohol Use Among Young Adolescents in Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany and Austria: The Effects of Type of Education.” Young 21(4): 363-385.
  • Berten, H. and N. Vettenburg (2013). Risky or intense alcohol use from a multilevel perspective: Individuals within schools within countries: The School. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 199-213.
  • Berten, H. and N. Vettenburg (2013). Social contexts, other factors and their influence on alcohol consumption: A combined model. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 167-181.
  • Berten, H. and N. Vettenburg (2013). Social contexts, other factors and their influence on alcohol consumption: The School. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 93-115.
  • Berten, H., et al. (2013). Policies, programmes and interventions: Results of focus groups with practitioners, policymakers and researchers. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 305-317.
  • Bräker, A.-B., et al. (2013). Alcohol use patterns of youngsters from 25 European countries: A comparison of cluster analysis and defining by theoretical premeditated conditions. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 67-76.
  • Bräker, A.-B., et al. (2013). Country level predictors of alcohol use: The impact of alcohol policy, drinking culture characteristics and socioeconomic conditions of alcohol use. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 255-264.
  • Brown, S. E., et al. (2013). Explaining Crime and Its Context. Anderson Publishing.
  • Buckle, M. E. and D. S. Walsh (2013). “Teaching Responsibility to Gang-Affiliated Youths.” Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance 84(2): 53-58.
  • C, C. (2013). “Masculinities, persistannce and desistance.” Criminology 51: 661-693.
  • Castro, J., et al. (2013). Juvenile Delinquency: A Crosstalk between Individual an Social Factors. 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • Costa, T. A. M. (2013). Da vitimização infantil ao desvio e delinquência juvenil : estudo exploratório com a aplicação do instrumento ISRD-2. Dissertação de Mestrado. Escola de Psicologia, University of Minho.
  • Covaleskie, J. F. (2013). Membership and Moral Formation : Shame as an Educational and Social Emotion., Charlotte, US: Information Age Publishing,.
  • Craig, J. and H. Foster (2013). “Desistance in the Transition to Adulthood: The Roles of Marriage, Military, and Gender.” Deviant Behavior 34(3): 208-223.
  • Research is needed on desistance from crime comparatively by gender. This research uses a national longitudinal sample of youth transitioning to adulthood. Drawing on Sampson and Laub’s Age-Graded Theory of Informal Social Control, social bonds found in marriage and military involvement are examined to determine if they decrease delinquency over time. The results for the full sample revealed that marriage but not military involvement led to desistance. However, gender sub-sample analyses further showed military enlistment led females, but not males, to desist from crime. Implications and future research aims are discussed.
  • Cullen, F. T. and P. Wilcox (2013). “The Oxford handbook of criminological theory.” from http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199747238.001.0001.
  • This handbook presents a series of essays that captures not the past of criminology, but where theoretical explanation is headed. The volume is replete with ideas, discussions of substantive topics with salient theoretical implications, and reviews of literatures that illuminate avenues along which theory and research evolve.
  • Diener, E., et al. (2013). Universal and cultural differences in the causes and structure of “happiness” – A multilevel review. Mental well-being: International contributions to the study of positive mental healths. C. Keyes. Dordrecht, the Netherlands, Springer: 153-176.
  • Dixon, B. (2013). “The aetiological crisis in South African criminology.” Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology 46(3): 319-334.
  • Eisner, M. and t. Malti (2013). The future of evidence-based bullying and violence prevention in childhood and adolescence, European Science Foundation.
  • Ellonen, N., et al. (2013). “Exposure to Parental Violence and Outcomes of Child Psychosocial Adjustment.” Violence and Victims 28(1): 3-15.
  • Enzmann, D. (2013). “The impact of questionnaire design on prevalence and incidence rates of self-reported delinquency: Results of an experiment modifying the ISRD-2 questionnaire.” 29: 147-177 %J Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice.
  • Enzmann, D. and J. Kivivuori (2013). Surveying Sensitive Questions: Prevalence Estimates of Self-Reported Delinquency Using the Crosswise Model. 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • Enzmann, D. and I. H. Marshall (2013). Tricky Business: Units of Analysis in Cross-national Comparative Research. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Atlanta, GA.
  • Enzmann, D. and I. H. Marshall (2013). Tricky business: Units of analysis in cross-national comparative research. 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Atlanta, GA, American Society of Criminology.
  • Farrington, D., et al. (2013). Offending from Childhood to
  • Late Middle Age: Recent Results from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent
  • New York, Springer.
  • Foster, H. and J. Brooks-Gunn (2013). “Neighborhood, family and individual influences on school physical victimization.” Journal ofYouth and Adolescence 42: 1596–1610.
  • Fraser, A. (2013). “Ethnography at the periphery: Redrawing the borders of criminology’s world-map.” Theoretical Criminology 17(2): 251-260.
  • In the current era of globalization, a paradox has developed in the field of criminology. In the context of the increasingly global nature of crime, there has been a firm recognition among criminologists of the need for comparative, transnational research; particularly that which moves beyond knowledge created in the global North. However, production of this knowledge remains clustered in a relatively narrow range of geographical sites—and understandings of crime and criminology in the South too often defined through the lens of the North. As processes of globalization confound and disrupt the traditional dualisms of East/West and North/South, there is a pressing need for an expansion of criminology’s world-map. This article explores the conceptual possibilities of one particular methodology—ethnography—as a means of explicating the deep-seated tensions, fragmented realities and hybridized identities that emerge from the margins of globalization. Drawing on cogent debates from the fields of sociology and anthropology, I argue that ethnographically informed ‘theory from the South’ can at once enrich the criminological imagination and provoke a more cosmopolitan global imaginary.
  • Garland, D. (2013). “Penality and the Penal State.” Criminology 51(3): 475-517.
  • Gatti, U. and G. Rocca (2013). Is male gender still a risk factor for juvenile delinquency? 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2013). Social contexts, other factors and their influence on alcohol consumption: Delinquency, Victimization and alcohol involvement. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, A. Berchtold and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 139-154.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2013). Risky or intense alcohol use from a multilevel perspective: Individuals within schools within countries: Delinquency and alcohol use. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 237-246.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2013). “Effects of delinquency on alcohol use among juveniles in Europe: Results from the ISRD-2 study.” 19: 153-170 %J European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.
  • Gavray, C., et al. (2013). “The Impact of Societal Vulnerability and Violent Values on Self-Control in a Belgium Sample of Youth: A Gender Comparison.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 13-31.
  • General, O. o. t. D. A. (2013). Memorandum for all United States Attorneys. Guidance regarding marijuana enforcement. U. S. D. o. Justice. Washington D.C.:
  • George, L. K. (2013). Life-Course Perspectives on Mental Health. Handbook of the Sociology of Mental Health. C. S. Aneshensel, J. C. Phelan and A. Bierman. Dordrecht, Springer Netherlands: 585-602.
  • The cross-fertilization of the sociology of mental health and life-course perspectives is a valuable and increasingly investigated research topic. Mental health is dynamic rather than static, and life-course principles provide conceptual and methodological tools for understanding those dynamics. The purpose of this chapter is to review the state of the science with regard to mental health and illness in life-course perspective. It begins with a review of fundamental life-course principles, including examples of their utility for contributing to our understanding of mental health. A brief section summarizes methodological advances that permit analyses of long-term patterns of stability and change in mental health and its risk and protective factors. The core of this chapter reviews research on four key topics that combine life-course perspectives with major issues in the sociology of mental health. This chapter ends with brief recommendations for future research.
  • Getoš, A.-M. and R. Bezić (2013). ISRD3 Croatia. 1st Results for Varaždin. 11/22/2013. Zagreb, Croatia.
  • Gibson, C. L. and M. D. Krohn, Eds. (2013). Handbook of Life-Course Criminology. New York, Springer.
  • Glynn, M. (2013). Black Men, Invisibility, and Desistance from Crime: Towards a Critical Race Theory from Crime, Routledge.
  • Group, I. W. (2013). Questionnaire ISRD3. Standard Student Questionnaire. ISRD3 Technical Report Series #2.
  • Haymoz, S. and U. Gatti (2013). Girl Members of Deviant Youth Groups, Offending Behaviour and Victimisation: Results from the ISRD2 in Italy and Switzerland. The Modern Gang Reader. Fourth Edition. C. L. Maxson, A. Egley Jr., J. Miller and M. W. Klein. New York, Oxford University Press.
  • Haymoz, S. and U. Gatti (2013). Les groupes de pairs deviants en Europe selon les resultats de l’enquete de l’ISRD2. Kriminologie, Kriminalpolitik und Strafrecht aus internationaler Perspektive: Festschrift fur Martin Killias zum 65. Bern, Switzerland: 149-164.
  • Haymoz, S. and U. Gatti (2013). Les groupes de pairs déviants en Europe selon les resultats de l’enquete de l’ISRD2. Kriminologie, Kriminalpolitik und Strafrecht aus internationaler Perspektive : Festschrift für Martin Killias zum 65. Geburtstag. A. Kuhn, P. Margot, M. F. Aebi et al. Bern, Stämpfli: 149-164.
  • Heinrichs, K., et al., Eds. (2013). Handbook of moral motivation. Theories, models, applications. Moral Development and Citizenship Education. Rotterdam/Boston/Taipei, Sense Publishers.
  • Heinrichs, K., et al., Eds. (2013). <Heinrichs et al Handbook of Moral Motivation Theories.pdf>. Rotterdam, the Netherlands, Sense.
  • Higginson, a., et al. (2013). Preventive interventions to reduce youth gang violence in low- and middle income countries: A systematic review, Campbell Collaboration.
  • Hitlin, S. and S. Vaisey (2013). “The New Sociology of Morality.” Annual Review of Sociology 39(1): 51-68.
  • Hofmann, W., et al. (2013). “Yes, but are they happy? Effects of trait self-control on affective well-being and life satisfaction.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 82: 265-277.
  • Holdaway, S. (2013). “Globalization, Police Reform and Development: Doing It the Western Way? By Graham Ellison and Nathan W. Pino (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, 258pp.  55.00).” British Journal of Criminology 53(5): 967-969.
  • Hough, M. (2013). Using the ISRD to Test Procedural Justice Theory. 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • Jonkman, H., et al. (2013). Risky or intense alcohol use from a multilevel perspective: Individuals within schools within countries: Neighbourhood disorganization. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 229-236.
  • Kapardis, A. (2013). Juvenile delinquency and justice in Cyprus. Risk Assessment for Juvenile Violent Offending. A. C. Baldry and A. Kapardis. Oxon, Routledge: 43-58.
  • Kapardis, A. (2013). “Juvenile Delinquency and Victimization in Cyprus.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 19(2): 171-182.
  • Kask, K., et al. (2013). “The Effect of Family Factors on Intense Alcohol Use among European Adolescents: A Multilevel Analysis.” Psychiatry Journal 2013: 1-12.
  • Kask, K., et al. (2013). Risky or intense alcohol use from a multilevel perspective: Individuals within schools within countries: The family. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 185-198.
  • Keefe, P. R. (2013). “Buzzkill. How do you set up a legal market for pot?” The New Yorker(November 18): 40-51.
  • Killias, M. and A. Lukash (2013). ISRD-3 in Switzerland, Eastern European and Asian Countries: Some Preliminary Experiences. 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • Kivivuori, J., et al. (2013). Kansainvälisen nuorisorikollisuuskyselyn (ISRD-3) mittaukset Suomessa 2013. Oikeuspoliittisen tutkimuslaitoksen verkkokatsauksia 35/2013. Helsinki.
  • Koopmans, R. (2013). “Multiculturalism and Immigration: A Contested Field in Cross-National Comparison.” Annual Review of Sociology 39(1): 147-169.
  • Kruttschnitt, C. (2013). “Gender and Crime.” Annual Review of Sociology 39(1): 291-308.
  • Lahlah, E., et al. (2013). “When love hurts: assessing the intersectionality of ethnicity, socio-economic status, parental connectedness, child abuse, and gender attitudes in juvenile violent delinquency.” Child Abuse Negl 37(11): 1034-1049.
  • Researchers have not yet reached agreement about the validity of several competing explanations that seek to explain ethnic differences in juvenile violent offending. Ethnicity cannot solely explain why boys with an ethnic minority background commit more (violent) crimes. By assessing the intersectionality of structural, cultural and individual considerations, both the independent effects as well as the interplay between different factors can be examined. This study shows that aforementioned factors cumulatively play a role in severe violent offending, with parental connectedness and child abuse having the strongest associations. However, since most variables interact and ethnicity is associated with those specific factors, a conclusion to be drawn is that ethnicity may be relevant as an additional variable predicting severe violent offending although indirectly.
  • Lee, M. and K. J. Laidler (2013). “Doing criminology from the periphery: Crime and punishment in Asia.” Theoretical Criminology 17(2): 141-157.
  • Liu, J., et al. (2013). Handbook of Asian criminology. New York, NY, New York, NY : Springer.
  • With many of its countries undertaking development and modernization–and others taking major roles on the global stage–Asia is a region in flux. And as with any area in transition, there are myriad opportunities for crime to flourish. But at the same time that illegal activities are on the rise, so is the emergence of robust crime research in the region.The Handbook of Asian Criminology analyzes illicit enterprises and criminal justice efforts across a vast and varied continent. Contributions represent countries familiar in the West (Japan, Taiwan) and less known (Cambodia, Malaysia), and crimes examined range from the typical (homicide, drug trafficking) to the timely (human trafficking, insurance fraud, intellectual property crime). Expert studies of victims, of criminals as cultural icons, of the rise of the restorative justice movement, and of criminology itself demonstrate why Asia is viewed as a vanguard by colleagues elsewhere in the world. Among the topics covered:Cybercrime in Asia: trends and challenges.Curbing corruption and enhancing trust in government: lessons from Singapore and Hong Kong.Development of criminology in Japan: a sociological perspective.Contemporary crime and punishment in Thailand.Victims of domestic violence in India: do they have rights?Evolution of restorative justice for juvenile offenders in the People’s Republic of China.The Handbook of Asian Criminology is a groundbreaking volume for researchers in criminology and criminal justice, particularly with an interest in the fields in Asia, as well as those in related disciplines such as sociology and international studies.
  • Liu, J., et al. (2013). Progress of Asian Criminology: Editors’ Introduction. Handbook of Asian Criminology. J. Liu, B. Hebenton and S. Jou. New York, Springer: 1-11.
  • Longazel, J. G. and B. Fleury-Steiner (2013). “Beware of notarios: Neoliberal governance of immigrants as crime victims.” Theoretical Criminology 17(3): 359-376.
  • Lu, Y.-F., et al. (2013). “Exploring the Utility of Self-Control Theory for Risky Behavior and Minor Delinquency Among Chinese Adolescents.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 32-52.
  • Lu, Y. F., et al. (2013). “Exploring the Utility of Self-Control Theory for Risky Behavior and Minor Delinquency Among Chinese Adolescents.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 32-52.
  • Lukash, A., et al. (2013). First Results of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD3) survey – India. Annual Conference of the American Society of Criminology. Atlanta, GA.
  • Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2013). First Results in Some European and Asian Countries: Participants in International Study of Self-Report Delinquency (ISRD3). Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. Atlanta, GA.
  • Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2013). First Results of International Self-Report Delinquency Studies (ISRD-3) in Switzerland. 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • M, V. B., et al. (2013). “Getting out:” A summary of qualitative research across the life course. Handbook of Life-Course Criminology. C. L. Gibson and M. D. Krohn. New York, Springer: 233-260.
  • Malti, T., et al. (2013). “Do Moral Choices Make Us Feel Good? The Development of Adolescents’ Emotions Following Moral Decision Making.” Journal of Research on Adolescence 23(2): 389-397.
  • Manchak, S., et al. (2013). Mental health and crime.
  • Markina, A. and K. Kask (2013). “The Effects of Family Factors on Alcohol Consumption in Three East-European Countries.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 53-69.
  • Markina, A. and K. Kask (2013). Social contexts, other factors and their influence on alcohol consumption: The family. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 79-92.
  • Marshall, C. E. (2013). “Self-Reported Property Crime Patterns in 30 Countries: Adventures in Multivariate Exploratory Data Analysis.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 125-146.
  • Marshall, C. E. and I. H. Marshall (2013). Bullying: Results from a Comparative Study. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Atlanta, GA.
  • Marshall, C. E. and I. H. Marshall (2013). Bullying: Results from a comparative study. 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Atlanta, GA, American Society of Criminology.
  • Marshall, I., Haen and H. Boutellier (2013). Special Issue on Compassionate Criminology: The Legacy of Josine Junger-Tas.
  • Marshall, I. H. (2013). Using the ISRD to Develop a More Integrated Theoretical Perspective of Youth Crime: Focus on SAT and IAT. 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • Marshall, I. H. and H. Boutellier (2013). “Josine Junger-Tas: The Life and Works of a Compassionate Criminologist.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 19(2 (June)): 71-84.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2013). International Self-Report Delinquency Questionnaire 3 (ISRD3). Background paper to explain ISRD2-ISRD3 changes. ISRD3 Technical Report Series. # 3.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2013). International Self-Report Delinquency Questionnaire 3 (ISRD-3). Background paper to explain ISRD2-ISRD3 changes. ISRD3 Technical Report Series #1.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2013). Overview of International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD3). Poster presentation. 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • Marshall, I. H. and A. Maljevic (2013). “Editors’ Introduction: Theoretical and Methodological Insights From the Second International Self-Report Study of Delinquency (ISRD-2).” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 4-12.
  • Marshall, I. H. and A. Maljevic (2013). “Editors¿ introduction: Theoretical and methodological insights from the Second International Self-Report Study of Delinquency (ISRD-2).” 29: 4-12 %J Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice.
  • Marshall, I. H. and A. Maljević (2013). “Editor’s Introduction: Theoretical and Methodological Insights From the Second International Self-Report Study of Delinquency (ISRD-2).” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 4-12.
  • Masyn, K. (2013). Latent class analysis and finite mixture modeling. Oxford Handbook of Quantitative Methods in Psycholgy: vol 2.
  • McConnachie, K. (2013). “Adam Crawford (ed.), International and Comparative Criminal Justice and Urban Governance: Convergence and Divergence in Global, National and Local Settings.” Punishment & Society 15(2): 202-204.
  • Moestue, H., et al. (2013). Youth violence prevention in Latin america and the Carribbean: A scoping review of the evidence, Norwegian Peacebuilding Resource Center. August 2013.
  • Executive summary
  • By Helen Moestue,
  • Leif Moestue and
  • Robert Muggah
  • Youth violence prevention in Latin America and the Caribbean: a scoping review of the evidence
  • Youth violence is reaching epidemic levels in some parts of Latin America. It is also a top priority for the
  • region’s policymakers, with growing investments in youth violence prevention and reduction. Yet the
  • knowledge base on what works and what does not in terms of youth violence prevention is comparatively
  • thin, and there is comparatively limited awareness of existing or planned impact studies. In order to fill this
  • knowledge gap, this report assesses the state of the literature on youth violence impact assessments in 33
  • countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. Following a systematic review of published and unpublished
  • articles and interviews with dozens of experts, just 18 studies were detected. And while most of these came
  • from Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Jamaica, several large randomised controlled trials are planned or
  • ongoing in selected Central American and Caribbean countries. Taken together, the report highlights
  • opportunities and limitations in academic, advocacy and policy debates on youth violence prevention. It
  • recommends the application of longer-term and stronger study designs in future research, particularly of
  • early childhood- and family-oriented interventions. What is urgently required are more comprehensive
  • evaluations and the development of standardised metrics to track the many dimensions of youth violence.
  • Moravcová, E. (2013). “Problematika part, gangů a delikventních uskupení mládeže. Otázka členství v gangu.” Acta Universitatis Carolinae Philosophica et Historica 2: 85-104.
  • Moravcová, E., et al. (2013). Juvenile Delinquency in the Czech Republic: First Results from a Self-Report Survey ISRD-3. 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • Morillo, S., et al. (2013). Autocontrol y conducta desviada: Una exploración con datos Venezolanos. La Generalidad de la Teoría del Autocontrol. A. Serrano Maíllo and C. Birkbeck. Madrid, Dykinson: 245-274.
  • Nowak, C. (2013). “The internationalization of the Polish criminal law: how the Polish criminal law changed under the influence of globalization.” Crime, Law and Social Change 59(2): 139-156.
  • Owens, P. B., et al. (2013). “Social Scientific Inquiry Into Genocide and Mass Killing: From Unitary Outcome to Complex Processes.” Annual Review of Sociology 39(1): 69-84.
  • Pacula, R. L. and E. L. Sevigny (2013). “Marijuana Liberalization Policies: Why We Can’t Learn Much from Policy Still in Motion.” Journal of Policy Analysis and Management: n/a-n/a.
  • Pedersen, M. L. (2013). Selvrapporteret Kriminalitet. En sammenligning mellem Odense og Storkøbenhavn 2012 og Storkøbenhavn 2006 og 2012. København, Justitsministeriets Forskningskontor.
  • Pierotti, R. S. (2013). “Increasing Rejection of Intimate Partner Violence: Evidence of Global Cultural Diffusion.” American Sociological Review 78(2): 240-265.
  • This study extends existing world society research on ideational diffusion by going beyond examinations of national policy change to investigate the spread of ideas among nonelite individuals. Specifically, I test whether recent trends in women’s attitudes about intimate partner violence are converging toward global cultural scripts. Results suggest that global norms regarding violence against women are reaching citizens worldwide, including in some of the least privileged parts of the globe. During the first decade of the 2000s, women in 23 of the 26 countries studied became more likely to reject intimate partner violence. Structural socioeconomic or demographic changes, such as urbanization, rising educational attainment, increasing media access, and cohort replacement, fail to explain the majority of the observed trend. Rather, women of all ages and social locations became less likely to accept justifications for intimate partner violence. The near uniformity of the trend and speed of the change in attitudes about intimate partner violence suggest that global cultural diffusion has played an important role.
  • Podaná, Z. and J. Buriánek (2013). “Does Cultural Context Affect the Association Between Self-Control and Problematic Alcohol Use Among Juveniles? A Multilevel Analysis of 25 European Countries.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 70-87.
  • Podaná, Z. and J. Buriánek (2013). Risky or intense alcohol use from a multilevel perspective: Individuals within schools within countries: Self-control. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 247-253.
  • Podaná, Z. and J. Buriánek (2013). Social contexts, other factors and their influence on alcohol consumption: Self-control. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 155-166.
  • Posick, C. (2013). “The Overlap Between Offending and Victimization Among Adolescents: Results From the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 106-124.
  • Posick, C. (2013). Untangling offending and victimization: a comparative study of the victim-offender overlap. School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Northeastern University. D.
  • Reed, E., et al. (2013). “Adolescent Experiences of Violence and Relation to Violence Perpetration beyond Young Adulthood among an Urban Sample of Black and African American Males.” Journal of Urban Health 91(1): 96-106.
  • The purpose of this study is to determine if experiences of physical violence during early and late adolescence (12–21 years) places urban Black males at increased risk for interpersonal violence perpetration beyond young adulthood (30 years and older). Participants of this cross-sectional study were Black and African American men (N = 455) between the ages of 30 and 65 years, recruited from four urban clinical sites in the Northeast. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyze the relation of adolescent experiences of violence to: (1) past 6 month street violence involvement and (2) past year intimate partner violence perpetration. Ten percent of the sample reported that they experienced adolescent victimization. Men reporting adolescent victimization were significantly more likely to report past 6-month street violence involvement (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 3.2, 95 % CI = 1.7–6.3) and past 6 month intimate partner violence perpetration (AOR = 2.8, 95 % CI = 1.8–5.4) compared to men who did not report such victimization. Study findings suggest that in order to prevent adulthood perpetration of violence, more work is needed to address experiences of victimization among young Black males, particularly violence experienced during adolescence.
  • Ren, L., et al. (2013). Exploring the Dimensionality of Perceived Social Bonding among Juveniles: A US and China Comparison. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. Atlanta, GA.
  • Roberts, B. R. and Y. Chen (2013). “Drugs, Violence, and the State.” Annual Review of Sociology 39(1): 105-125.
  • Rocca, G., et al. (2013). Practices and interventions for prevention of alcohol use among young people in Europe: Synthesis report and identification of effective programmes. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 293-303.
  • Ryo, E. (2013). “Deciding to Cross: Norms and Economics of Unauthorized Migration.” American Sociological Review 78(4): 574-603.
  • Why are there so many unauthorized migrants in the United States? Using unique survey data collected in Mexico through the Mexican Migration Project, I develop and test a new decision-making model of unauthorized labor migration. The new model considers the economic motivations of prospective migrants, as well as their beliefs, attitudes, and social norms regarding U.S. immigration law and legal authorities. My findings show that perceptions of certainty of apprehension and severity of punishment are not significant determinants of the intent to migrate illegally; however, perceptions of availability of Mexican jobs and the dangers of border crossing are significant determinants of these intentions. In addition, individuals’ general legal attitudes, morality about violating U.S. immigration law, views about the legitimacy of U.S. authority, and norms about border crossing are significant determinants of the intent to migrate illegally. Perceptions of procedural justice are significantly related to beliefs in the legitimacy of U.S. authority, suggesting that, all else being equal, procedural fairness may produce greater deference to U.S. immigration law. Together, the results show that the decision to migrate illegally cannot be fully understood without considering an individual’s underlying values and norms.
  • Scheithauer, H., et al. (2013). Descriptive Analysis of Substance Use in Europe. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 53-66.
  • Sikkink, K. and H. J. Kim (2013). “The Justice Cascade: The Origins and Effectiveness of Human Rights Violations.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 9(1): 130819115115002.
  • Simpson, S. S. (2013). “White-Collar Crime: A Review of Recent Developments and Promising Directions for Future Research.” Annual Review of Sociology 39(1): 309-331.
  • Spini, D., et al. (2013). War, community, and social change : collective experiences in the former Yugoslavia, New York, New York : Springer.
  • War, Community, and Social Change documents and analyses how social representations and practices are shaped by collective violence in a context of ethnic discourse. What are the effects of political violence, and what are the effects of collectively experienced victimization on societal norms, attitudes, and collective beliefs? This volume stresses that mass violence has a de- and re-structuring role for manifold psychosocial processes. The interdisciplinary approach draws attention to how most people in the former Yugoslavia had to endure and cope with war and dramatic societal changes, but also how they faced and resisted ethnic rivalry, violence, and segregation. It is a departure from the belief that depicts most people in the former Yugoslavia as either blind followers of ethnic war entrepreneurs or as extremists intrinsically motivated for violence by deep-rooted intra-ethnic loyalties and inter-ethnic animosities.
  • Steketee, M., et al. (2013). Risky or intense alcohol use from a multilevel perspective: Individuals within schools within countries: Peers and deviant group behaviour. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 215-227.
  • Steketee, M., et al. (2013). Social contexts, other factors and their influence on alcohol consumption: Leisure time and Peers. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 117-128.
  • Steketee, M., et al. (2013). Afterthoughts about alcohol use among juveniles. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 321-336.
  • Steketee, M. and H. Jonkman (2013). Theory and model of the study Alcohol use among Adolescents in Europe. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 17-33.
  • Steketee, M., et al., Eds. (2013). Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut.
  • Steketee, M. and J. Junger-Tas (2013). Jeugdcriminaliteit: Het verschil tussen jongens en meisjes. Criminele meisjes en vrouwen: Achtergronden en aanpak. A.-M. Slotboom, M. Hoeve, M. Ezinga and P. van der Helm. Den Haag, Boom: 351-380.
  • Steketee, M., et al. (2013). “Sex Differences in the Predictors of Juvenile Delinquency: Females Are More Susceptible to Poor Environments; Males Are Influenced More by Low Self-Control.” Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice 29(1): 88-105.
  • Steketee, M. and J. van den Toorn (2013). Methodology and design. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 35-50.
  • Sweeten, G., et al. (2013). “Disengaging From Gangs and Desistance From Crime.” Justice Quarterly 30(3): 469-500.
  • Taefi, A. (2013). Involvement in Delinquency and Views on Prevention – Students’ Views. 13th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Budapest.
  • Tankebe, J. and A. Liebling (2013). Legitimacy and criminal justice: An international exploration, OUP Oxford.
  • Tate, K., et al. (2013). Something’s in the Air: Race, Crime, and the Legalization of Marijuana, Routledge.
  • Thoma, S., et al. (2013). “Describing and testing an intermediate concept measure of adolescent moral thinking.” European Journal of Developmental Psychology 10(2): 239-252.
  • Tuller, L. and I. H. Marshall (2013). Does the School Moderate Neighborhood Effects? Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Atlanta, GA.
  • Tuller, L. and I. H. Marshall (2013). Does the school moderate neighborhood effects? 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Atlanta, GA, American Society of Criminology.
  • United Nations (2013). Happiness: towards a holistic approach to development. Note by the Secretary-General,. A/67/697.
  • van den Toorn, J., et al. (2013). Social contexts, other factors and their influence on alcohol consumption: The neighbourhood. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 129-138.
  • van den Toorn, J., et al. (2013). Paper on policies toward alcohol among juveniles in Europe. Alcohol use Among Adolescents in Europe. Environmental Research and Preventive Actions. M. Steketee, H. Jonkman, H. Berten and N. Vettenburg. Utrecht, Verwey-Jonker Instituut: 279-292.
  • Van Kesteren, J., et al. (2013). “The International Crime Victims Surveys: A retrospective.” International Review of Victimology 20: 49-69.
  • Vettenburg, N., et al. (2013). “Societal vulnerability and adolescent offending: The role of violent values, self-control and troublesome youth group involvement.” European Journal of Criminology 10(4): 444-461.
  • Veysey, B. M., et al. (2013). “Getting out:” A summary of qualitative research across the life course. Handbook of Life-Course Criminology. C. L. Gibson and M. D. Krohn. New York, Springer: 233-260.
  • Whelan, P. (2013). “Cartel Criminalization and the Challenge of ‘Moral Wrongfulness’.” Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33(3): 535-561.
  • There is considerable debate at present, particularly in the Member States of the European Union, concerning the necessity and appropriateness of imposing custodial sentences upon individuals who have engaged in cartel activity. The vast majority of those contributing to this debate have focused on the punishment theory of (economic) deterrence. Little room is devoted to the punishment theory of retribution or to consideration of the ‘moral wrongfulness’ of cartel activity. This article posits that the issue of ‘moral wrongfulness’ is a central issue in the debate on cartel criminalization, irrespective of whether it is deterrence theory or retribution theory that informs the debate. By employing a norms-based approach, this article then examines the extent to which cartel activity can indeed be interpreted as conduct that is ‘morally wrong’ due to its violation of the moral norms against stealing, deception and/or cheating. By doing so, this article not only challenges traditional views of the nature of cartel activity but also provides scholars, legislatures and policymakers with specific analyses which are crucial to a decision whether to justify (or indeed to oppose) the introduction and maintenance of criminal cartel sanctions.
  • Wright, E. M. and A. A. Fagan (2013). “The Cycle of Violence in Context: Exploring the Moderating Roles of Neighborhood Disadvantage and Cultural Norms.” Criminology 51(2): 217-249.

2012

(Aas 2012, Aas 2012, Administration and Education 2012, Aliverti 2012, Alves and Arias 2012, Aneshensel, Phelan et al. 2012, Barnes and Beaver 2012, Bersani 2012, Bertok and Meško 2012, Body-Gendrot 2012, Bolyky, Parti et al. 2012, Bosick, Rennison et al. 2012, Bosworth 2012, Botchkovar, Marshall et al. 2012, Botchkovar, Marshall et al. 2012, Bovenkerk 2012, Brank, Hoetger et al. 2012, Burt, Simons et al. 2012, Bybee 2012, CalverleyA. 2012, Carpenter 2012, Caulkins, Kilmer et al. 2012, Caulkins, Lee et al. 2012, Center 2012, Cerda, Wall et al. 2012, Cerdá, Wall et al. 2012, Chorev 2012, DiPietro and Bursik 2012, Dipietro and McGloin 2012, Egli, Lucia et al. 2012, Enzmann 2012, Enzmann 2012, Evenepoel 2012, Frank and Phillips 2012, Gatti, Haymoz et al. 2012, Gatti, Soellner et al. 2012, Gideon 2012, Giorgi 2012, Giulianotti and Robertson 2012, Goergen, Kraus et al. 2012, Grossrieder 2012, Gruszczyńska, Lucia et al. 2012, Haen Marshall and Enzmann 2012, Herzog and Einat 2012, Holder 2012, Hovens, Giltay et al. 2012, Ipsos Public Affairs 2012, Jennings, Piquero et al. 2012, Joseph, Murphy et al. 2012, Junger-Tas 2012, Junger-Tas 2012, Junger-Tas, Enzmann et al. 2012, Junger-Tas and Marshall 2012, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2012, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2012, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2012, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2012, Junger-Tas, Steketee et al. 2012, Justice 2012, Kangaspunta and Marshall 2012, Karstedt 2012, Kaufman 2012, Killias, Redondo et al. 2012, King 2012, Kivivuori and Rimpelä 2012, Klima and Wijckmans 2012, Knepper 2012, Lambert, Jaishankar et al. 2012, Lucia, Killias et al. 2012, Lukash 2012, Lukash and Killias 2012, Lukash and Killias 2012, Lukash and Killias 2012, Markina and Kask 2012, Marshall and Marshall 2012, Marshall and Marshall 2012, Marshall and Enzmann 2012, Marshall and Enzmann 2012, Marshall and Enzmann 2012, Marshall and Enzmann 2012, Marshall and Summers 2012, Matjasko, Vivolo-Kantor et al. 2012, Mears, Cochran et al. 2012, Messner 2012, Moravcova 2012, Moravcová 2012, Moravcová 2012, Moravcová 2012, Nadelmann, Gutwillig et al. 2012, Narag and De Guzman 2012, Obeida 2012, Podaná and Buriánek 2012, Pyrooz and Decker 2012, Rocca, Verde et al. 2012, Sachs 2012, Skolnick 2012, Smith, Park et al. 2012, Steketee 2012, Steketee 2012, Steketee 2012, Steketee and Jonkman 2012, Stets and Carter 2012, Sverdlik, Roccas et al. 2012, Taefi, Goergen et al. 2012, Taylor, Sullivan et al. 2012, Tsutsui, Whitlinger et al. 2012, Van Ours 2012, Vanfraechem 2012, Vettenburg, Pauwels et al. 2012, Wikstrom, Oberwittler et al. 2012, Zatz and Smith 2012)

  • Aas, K. F. (2012). “‘The Earth is one but the world is not’: Criminological theory and its geopolitical divisions.” Theoretical Criminology 16(1): 5-20.
  • The article addresses the prevailing assumptions about geo-political context in criminological theory. It draws on a well-developed and prolonged critique within sociology, gender and postcolonial studies, of the seemingly context-free nature of western social theory and its assumptions about the universality of its knowledge production. The article’s particular concern is criminology’s engagement with the global. By examining the ‘situated identity’ of criminological theory, and its claims to universality, the article raises questions about who produces theory, who has access to the universal, and what are the potential consequences for our understanding of the global.
  • Aas, K. F. (2012). “(In)security-at-a-distance: rescaling justice, risk and warfare in a transnational age.” Global Crime 13(4): 235-253.
  • Administration, D. E. and U. S. D. o. Education (2012). Growing up drug free. A parent’s guide to prevention. Washinton D.C.
  • Aliverti, A. (2012). “Making people criminal: The role of the criminal law in immigration enforcement.” Theoretical Criminology 16(4): 417-434.
  • Alves, M. C. and E. D. Arias (2012). “Understanding the Fica Vivo programme: two-tiered community policing in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.” Policing and Society 22(1): 101-113.
  • This paper analyzes the efficacy of the Fica Vivo homicide control programme in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Our data shows that the programme encountered significant success in reducing homicides, as a result of its innovative two-tiered structure in which community-oriented policing units operated in conjunction with state-administered social programmes led by civil servants at each of the programme sites. These efforts helped to build local capacity to respond to violence and work with state officials, helped the police engage with residents in efforts to control violence, and enabled residents to hold police to account for local crime control efforts.
  • Aneshensel, C. S., et al. (2012). Handbook of the sociology of mental health. Dordrecht
  • New York, Dordrecht
  • New York : Springer.
  • Barnes, J. C. and K. M. Beaver (2012). “Marriage and Desistance From Crime: A Consideration of Gene–Environment Correlation.” Journal of Marriage and Family 74(1): 19-33. NH
  • Bersani, B. E. (2012). “An Examination of First and Second Generation Immigrant Offending Trajectories.” Justice Quarterly 31(2): 315-343.
  • Bertok, E. and G. Meško (2012). Project YouPrev – Findings of Youth Survey, Conducted in Slovenia. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Body-Gendrot, S. (2012). Globalization, Fear and insecurity: The Challenges for Cities north and South. London, Palgrave.
  • Bolyky, O., et al. (2012). Bonding and attitude among the Czech, Estonian and Hungarian children and young people. Analysing study based on data of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study-2 (ISRD-2).
  • Bosick, S. J., et al. (2012). “Reporting violence to the police. Predictors through the life course.” Jounral of Criminal Justice 40: 441-451.
  • Bosworth, M. (2012). “Subjectivity and identity in detention: Punishment and society in a global age.” Theoretical Criminology 16(2): 123-140.
  • This article draws on ethnographic research that I conducted in five British immigration removal centres from November 2009 to June 2011, and considers the challenges these institutions pose to our understanding of penal power. These centres contain a complex mix of foreign national citizens including former and current asylum seekers, those without visas, visa over-stayers and post-sentence foreign national prisoners. For many non-British offenders, a period of confinement in an immigration detention centre is now, effectively, part of their punishment. What are the implications of this dual confinement and (how) can we understand it within the intellectual framework of punishment and society?
  • Botchkovar, E., et al. (2012). Testing SAT Using Comparative Data. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Chicago, IL.
  • Botchkovar, E., et al. (2012). Testing SAT using comparative data. 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Chicago, IL, American Society of Criminology.
  • Bovenkerk, F. (2012). “De opmerkelijke lage jeugddelinquentie in Suriname.” Oso 31(1): 26-39.
  • Brank, E. M., et al. (2012). “Bullying.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 8(1): 213-230.
  • Burt, C., et al. (2012). “Racial Discrimination, Ethnic-Racial Socialization, and Crime.” American Sociological Review 77(4): 648-677.
  • Bybee, K. J. (2012). “Paying Attention to What Judges Say: New Directions in the Study of Judicial Decision Making.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 8(1): 69-84.
  • (2012). Cultures ofDesistance: Rehabilitation, Reintegration and EthnicMinorities. New York, Routledge.
  • Carpenter, T. G. (2012). “Obama behind the Curve on Drug War.”
  • Caulkins, J. P., et al. (2012). “Design considerations for legalizing cannabis: lessons inspired by analysis of California’s Proposition 19.” Addiction 107(5): 865-871.
  • AIMS: No modern jurisdiction has ever legalized commercial production, distribution and possession of cannabis for recreational purposes. This paper presents insights about the effect of legalization on production costs and consumption and highlights important design choices. METHODS: Insights were uncovered through our analysis of recent legalization proposals in California. The effect on the cost of producing cannabis is largely based on existing estimates of current wholesale prices, current costs of producing cannabis and other legal agricultural goods, and the type(s) of production that will be permitted. The effect on consumption is based on production costs, regulatory regime, tax rate, price elasticity of demand, shape of the demand curve and non-price effects (e.g. change in stigma). RESULTS: Removing prohibitions on producing and distributing cannabis will dramatically reduce wholesale prices. The effect on consumption and tax revenues will depend on many design choices, including: the tax level, whether there is an incentive for a continued black market, whether to tax and/or regulate cannabinoid levels, whether there are allowances for home cultivation, whether advertising is restricted, and how the regulatory system is designed and adjusted. CONCLUSIONS: The legal production costs of cannabis will be dramatically below current wholesale prices, enough so that taxes and regulation will be insufficient to raise retail price to prohibition levels. We expect legalization will increase consumption substantially, but the size of the increase is uncertain since it depends on design choices and the unknown shape of the cannabis demand curve.
  • Caulkins, J. P., et al. (2012). “Marijuana Legalization: Lessons from the 2012 State Proposals.” World Medical & Health Policy 4(3-4): 4-34.
  • Center, O. f. V. o. C. T. a. T. A. (2012). child Abuse and Neglect.
  • Cerda, M., et al. (2012). “Medical marijuana laws in 50 states: investigating the relationship between state legalization of medical marijuana and marijuana use, abuse and dependence.” Drug Alcohol Depend 120(1-3): 22-27.
  • BACKGROUND: Marijuana is the most frequently used illicit substance in the United States. Little is known of the role that macro-level factors, including community norms and laws related to substance use, play in determining marijuana use, abuse and dependence. We tested the relationship between state-level legalization of medical marijuana and marijuana use, abuse, and dependence. METHODS: We used the second wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a national survey of adults aged 18+ (n=34,653). Selected analyses were replicated using the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), a yearly survey of approximately 68,000 individuals aged 12+. We measured past-year cannabis use and DSM-IV abuse/dependence. RESULTS: In NESARC, residents of states with medical marijuana laws had higher odds of marijuana use (OR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.49-2.47) and marijuana abuse/dependence (OR: 1.81; 95% CI: 1.22-2.67) than residents of states without such laws. Marijuana abuse/dependence was not more prevalent among marijuana users in these states (OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.67-1.60), suggesting that the higher risk for marijuana abuse/dependence in these states was accounted for by higher rates of use. In NSDUH, states that legalized medical marijuana also had higher rates of marijuana use. CONCLUSIONS: States that legalized medical marijuana had higher rates of marijuana use. Future research needs to examine whether the association is causal, or is due to an underlying common cause, such as community norms supportive of the legalization of medical marijuana and of marijuana use.
  • Cerdá, M., et al. (2012). “Medical marijuana laws in 50 states: Investigating the relationship between state legalization of medical marijuana and marijuana use, abuse and dependence.” Drug and alcohol dependence 120(1): 22-27.
  • Chorev, N. (2012). “Changing Global Norms through Reactive Diffusion: The Case of Intellectual Property Protection of AIDS Drugs.” American Sociological Review 77(5): 831-853.
  • This article explores conditions under which global norms change. I use a case study in which the original interpretation of an international agreement on intellectual property rights was modified to address demands for improved access to affordable AIDS drugs. Conventional theories that focus on international negotiations cannot fully account for the events in this case. Drawing on the theory of recursivity and insights from the literature on diffusion, I suggest that shifts in global norms occur through reactive diffusion of policies across states. Experiences accumulated in this ongoing process of reinvention eventually lead to a new, globally accepted reinterpretation of the original obligation.
  • DiPietro, S. M. and R. J. Bursik (2012). “Immigration and the changing social fabric of american cities.” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 641(May): 247-267.
  • Dipietro, S. M. and J. M. McGloin (2012). “Differential Susceptibility? Immigrant Youth and Peer Influence*.” Criminology 50(3): 711-742.
  • Egli, N. M., et al. (2012). “Integrated vs. differentiated school systems and their impact on delinquency.” European Journal of Criminology 9(3): 245-259.
  • Enzmann, D. (2012). Juvenile Delinquency and Norm Transmission Strength of Family and School. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Enzmann, D. (2012). Social Responses to Offending. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 143-182.
  • Evenepoel, A. (2012). Giving the Floor to the Youth of Today: Young People’s Views and Perspectives on Youth Crime and its Prevention. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Frank, D. J. and N. E. Phillips (2012). “Sex Laws and Sexuality Rights in Comparative and Global Perspectives.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 9(1): 130819115115002.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2012). Deviant youth groups and their impact on offending: Results from the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study in 30 countries. Stockholm Criminology Symposium. Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2012). Relationship Between Delinquency and Alcohol Use Among Juveniles in 25 European Countries: A Multilevel Analysis. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Gideon, L. (2012). Handbook of survey methodology for the social sciences. New York, NY, New York, NY : Springer.
  • Giorgi, M. (2012). “Actividades estructuradas / desestructuradas y delincuencia juvenil. Análisis de datos del ISRD-2.” Justicia Juris 8(2): 11-26.
  • Giulianotti, R. and R. Robertson (2012). “Mapping the global football field: a sociological model of transnational forces within the world game.” Br J Sociol 63(2): 216-240.
  • This paper provides a sociological model of the key transnational political and economic forces that are shaping the ‘global football field’. The model draws upon, and significantly extends, the theory of the ‘global field’ developed previously by Robertson. The model features four quadrants, each of which contains a dominant operating principle, an ‘elemental reference point’, and an ‘elemental theme’. The quadrants contain, first, neo-liberalism, associated with the individual and elite football clubs; second, neo-mercantilism, associated with nation-states and national football systems; third, international relations, associated with international governing bodies; and fourth, global civil society, associated with diverse institutions that pursue human development and/or social justice. We examine some of the interactions and tensions between the major institutional and ideological forces across the four quadrants. We conclude by examining how the weakest quadrant, featuring global civil society, may gain greater prominence within football. In broad terms, we argue that our four-fold model may be utilized to map and to examine other substantive research fields with reference to globalization.
  • Goergen, T., et al. (2012). Prevention of Youth Deviance and Delinquency in Europe: Adolescents’ and Experts’ Experiences in a Comparative Perspective. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Grossrieder, L. (2012). Interaction Between Self-Control and Social Learning: Relation Between Self-Control Level and Delinquent Peers in Explanation and Prediction of Juvenile Delinquent Behavior. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Gruszczyńska, B., et al. (2012). Juvenile Victimization from an International Perspective. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 95-116.
  • Haen Marshall, I. and D. Enzmann (2012). Methodology and design of the ISRD-2 study. The Many Faces of Youth Crime: Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. New York, NY, Springer: 21-65.
  • Herzog, S. and T. Einat (2012). “Moral Judgment, Crime Seriousness, and the Relations Between Them.” Crime & Delinquency 62(4): 470-500.
  • The present study analyzes the relationship between moral judgment and perceptions of crime seriousness. This analysis is done with special attention to Kohlberg?s theory of moral development. Main research findings: Significant correlations exist between perceived seriousness of offenses and consideration of such conducts as immoral, and between the levels of the perceived seriousness of offenses and the levels of the moral judgment of their moral dilemmas. In addition, attitudes toward various moral dilemmas are found to be influenced by education, ethnicity and social strata. Main conclusions: Correlation between moral reasoning and perceptions of crime seriousness is weak at best, and that mature-level socio-moral development and perceptions of crime seriousness might not necessarily protect a person from identifying with criminal acts.
  • Holder, M. D. (2012). Happiness in children. Measurement, correlates and enhancement of positive subjective well-being. New York, Springer.
  • Hovens, J. G. F. M., et al. (2012). “Impact of childhood life events and trauma on the course of depressive and anxiety disorders.” Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica 126(3): 198-207.
  • Ipsos Public Affairs (2012). I metodi educative e il ricorso a punizioni fisiche, Ipsos Public Affairs.
  • Jennings, W. G., et al. (2012). “On the overlap between victimization and offending: A review of the literature.” Aggression and Violent Behavior 17(1): 16-26.
  • Theoretical and empirical research investigating victimization and offending has largely been either ‘victim-focused’ or ‘offender-focused.’ This approach ignores the potential theoretical and empirical overlap that may exist among victims and offenders, otherwise referred to as ‘victim–offenders.’ This paper provides a comprehensive review of the research that has examined the relationship between victimization and offending. The review identified 37 studies, spanning over five decades (1958–2011), that have assessed the victim–offender overlap. The empirical evidence gleaned from these studies with regard to the victim–offender overlap is robust as 31 studies found considerable support for the overlap and six additional studies found mixed/limited support. The evidence is also remarkably consistent across a diversity of analytical and statistical techniques and across historical, contemporary, cross-cultural, and international assessments of the victim–offender overlap. In addition, this overlap is identifiable among dating/intimate partners and mental health populations. Conclusions and directions for future research are also discussed.
  • Joseph, S., et al. (2012). “An affective–cognitive processing model of post-traumatic growth.” Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy 19: 316-325.
  • Junger-Tas, J. (2012). Delinquent Behaviour in 30 Countries. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 69-93.
  • Junger-Tas, J. (2012). The Importance of the Family. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 185-209.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2012). Concluding Observations: The Big Picture. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 329-353.
  • Junger-Tas, J. and I. H. Marshall (2012). Introduction to the International Self-Report Study of Delinquency (ISRD-2). The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 3-20.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2012). The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. New York, Springer: 69-93.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2012). The many faces of youth crime. Contrasting theoretical perspectivs on juvenile delinquency across countries and cultures. New York, Springer.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2012). The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. New York, Springer.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2012). The Many Faces of Youth Crime: Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency Across Countries and Cultures. New York, NY, Springer.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2012). The Neighbourhood Context. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 257-284.
  • Justice, U. D. o. (2012). Indicators of school crime and safety: 2012. O. o. J. Programs.
  • Kangaspunta, K. and I. H. Marshall (2012). Trends in Violence against Women: Some Good News and Some Bad News.
  • Karstedt, S. (2012). “Mass Atrocities.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science.
  • Kaufman, E. (2012). “Book review: Salvatore Palidda (ed.), Racial Criminalization of Migrants in the 21st Century.” Theoretical Criminology 16(2): 255-257.
  • Killias, M., et al. (2012). European Perspectives. From Juvenile Delinquency to Adult Crime: Criminal Careers, Justice Policy and Prevention. R. Loeber and D. P. Farrington. New York, Oxford University Press: 278-314.
  • King, S. (2012). “Transformative agency and desistance from crime.” Criminology & Criminal Justice 13(3): 317-335.
  • Kivivuori, J. and A. Rimpelä (2012). Self-Reported Violence: An Exploratory Methodological Comparison of Mail and School Based Surveys. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Klima, N. and B. Wijckmans (2012). European cross-country crime statistics, surveys and reports. Brussels, European Crime Prevention Network.
  • Knepper, P. (2012). “Measuring the Threat of Global Crime: Insights from Research by the League of Nations into the Traffic in Women*.” Criminology 50(3): 777-809.
  • Lambert, E. G., et al. (2012). “Correlates of Formal and Informal Social Control on Crime Prevention: An Exploratory Study among University Students, Andhra Pradesh, India.” Asian Journal of Criminology 7(3): 239-250.
  • Societies control crime through a variety of both formal and informal methods, and the balance between these methods varies widely by culture. This exploratory study surveyed a convenience sample of 434 students attending a university in Andhra Pradesh, India, in order to examine their social control views. Although there was strong support for both forms of social control, informal control mechanisms (family, neighbors/neighborhood, and peers) were more likely to be ranked higher in importance than formal control mechanisms (courts, police, and correctional facilities). Ordinary ordinal regression and ordinary least squares regression results indicated that views on shaming and group punishment were related to the views of formal and informal control. Further research is needed to examine the forces that shape the formal and informal crime control views of Indian citizens.
  • Lucia, S., et al. (2012). The School and its Impact on Delinquency. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 211-235.
  • Lukash, A. (2012). Participation of Eastern- and Western European Countries in ISRD-3. The Base for Interpretation of Results of the Comparative Research. Doktorandenkolloquium „Grundlagen des Rechts“. University of Zurich, Switzerland.
  • Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2012). 5 Reasons of Ukraine participation in International Self-Report Delinquency Studies. 12th Anual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao,
  • Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2012). Self-Report Studies in Western and Eastern European and Asian countries: Challenges of Comparative Methodology. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Chicago, IL.
  • Lukash, A. and M. Killias (2012). Victimization Experience of Juveniles in Serbia and Other Countries of Western Europe. Comparative Issues of International Self-Report Delinquency Studies. 3rd Annual Conference of the Victimology Society of Serbia. Belgrade, Serbia.
  • Markina, A. and K. Kask (2012). The Effect of Family Factors on Adolescents’ Alcohol Use. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Marshall, C. and I. H. Marshall (2012). Data-Based Alternatives to Theoretical Classification of Countries in Comparative Research: ISRD2 Results. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Chicago, IL.
  • Marshall, C. and I. H. Marshall (2012). Data-based alternatives to theoretical classification of countries in comparative research: ISRD2 results. 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Chicago, IL, American Society of Criminology.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. Enzmann (2012). The Generalizability of Self-Control Theory. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 285-325.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. Enzmann (2012). Methodology and Design of the ISRD-2 Study. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 21-65.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. Enzmann (2012). Tricky Business: Unit of Analysis in Comparative Research. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. Enzmann (2012). Tricky business: Units of analysis in comparative research. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Bilbao, Spain, European Society of Criminology.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. L. Summers (2012). Contemporary Differences in Rates and Trends of Homicide Among European Nations.
  • Matjasko, J. L., et al. (2012). “A systematic meta-review of evaluations of youth violence prevention programs: Common and divergent findings from 25 years of meta-analyses and systematic reviews.” Aggression and Violent Behavior 17(6): 540-552.
  • Violence among youth is a pervasive public health problem. In order to make progress in reducing the burden of injury and mortality that result from youth violence, it is imperative to identify evidence-based programs and strategies that have a significant impact on violence. There have been many rigorous evaluations of youth violence prevention programs. However, the literature is large, and it is difficult to draw conclusions about what works across evaluations from different disciplines, contexts, and types of programs. The current study reviews the meta-analyses and systematic reviews published prior to 2009 that synthesize evaluations of youth violence prevention programs. This meta-review reports the findings from 37 meta-analyses and 15 systematic reviews; the included reviews were coded on measures of the social ecology, prevention approach, program type, and study design. A majority of the meta-analyses and systematic reviews were found to demonstrate moderate program effects. Meta-analyses yielded marginally smaller effect sizes compared to systematic reviews, and those that included programs targeting family factors showed marginally larger effects than those that did not. In addition, there are a wide range of individual/family, program, and study moderators of program effect sizes. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.
  • Mears, D. P., et al. (2012). “Self-Control Theory and Nonlinear Effects on Offending.” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 29(3): 447-476.
  • Messner, S. F. (2012). “Morality, Markets, and the Asc: 2011 Presidential Address to the American Society of Criminology*.” Criminology 50(1): 5-25.
  • Moravcova, E. (2012). Gang definition in ISRD-2: Possibility in revising a methodological research tool of eurogang. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Bilbao, Spain, European Society of Criminology.
  • Moravcová, E. (2012). Gang Definition in ISRD-2: Possibility in Revising a Methodological Research Tool of Eurogang. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Moravcová, E. (2012). Identifikace respondenta jako člena gangu v ISRD-2: Česká repulika v evropském kontextu. Department of Sociology, Charles University.
  • Moravcová, E. (2012). “Jak definovat a měřit členství v gangu: Česká republika v evropském kontextu.” Data a výzkum 6(2): 151-171.
  • Nadelmann, E., et al. (2012). “ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATIONS.” Addiction 107(5): 873-875.
  • Narag, R. E. and M. De Guzman (2012). “Delinquency and Crime Among Youths in the Philippines: A Test of Legal Cynicism.” Asian Journal of Criminology 7(1): 75-89.
  • The construct of legal cynicism is gaining currency in the United States and other western developed countries in explaining why people break the law. This construct is viable in societies with strong economies and mature political and criminal justice institutions. This paper asks whether the construct of legal cynicism is applicable in societies with differing economic, political and social conditions. Specifically, the paper investigates whether legal cynicism can explain the delinquent behaviors of youths in the Philippines. Despite diligent efforts to duplicate the measures of legal cynicism, the paper finds that this construct is a weak predictor of youth delinquent behaviors. This contradictory finding is explained by looking at the historical and sociopolitical conditions of the country.
  • Obeida, Z. (2012). “Perfiles de delincuentes especializados y delincuentes versátiles estudio cuantitativo basados en la información del ISRD-2 Suiza.” Justicia Juris 8(2): 102-119.
  • Podaná, Z. and J. Buriánek (2012). Does Cultural Context Affect the Association Between Self-Control and Juvenile Alcohol Consumption? 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Pyrooz, D. C. and S. H. Decker (2012). “Delinquent Behavior, Violence, and Gang Involvement in China.” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 29(2): 251-272.
  • Rocca, G., et al. (2012). “Alcohol use, delinquency and victimisation among young people in Europe: results of an international multicentre study (ISRD-2).” European Psychiatry 27 (Supplement 1): 1.
  • Sachs, J. (2012). Introduction. World Happiness Report. J. Helliwell, R. Layard and J. Sachs. New York, Sustainable Development Solutions Network.
  • Skolnick, J. H. (2012). “Legacies of Legal Realism: The Sociology of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 8(1): 1-10.
  • Smith, C., et al. (2012). “Long-Term Outcomes of Young Adults Exposed to Maltreatment.” Journal of Interpersonal Violence 28(1): 121-156.
  • Steketee, M. (2012). Alcohol in Europe among juveniles, and the influence of risk factors. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Steketee, M. (2012). The Lifestyles of Youth and Their Peers. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 237-255.
  • Steketee, M. (2012). Substance Use of Young People in 30 Countries. The Many Faces of Youth Crime. Contrasting Theoretical Perspectives on Juvenile Delinquency across Countries and Cultures. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 117-141.
  • Steketee, M. and H. Jonkman (2012). Alcohol use and effective programs. ?
  • Stets, J. E. and M. J. Carter (2012). “A Theory of the Self for the Sociology of Morality.” American Sociological Review 77(1): 120-140.
  • Sociology has seen a renewed interest in the study of morality. However, a theory of the self that explains individual variation in moral behavior and emotions is noticeably absent. In this study, we use identity theory to explain this variability. According to identity theory, actors are self-regulating entities whose goal is to verify their identities. An individual’s moral identity—wherever it falls on the moral–immoral continuum—guides behavior, and people experience negative emotions when identity verification does not ensue. Furthermore, the identity verification process occurs within situations that have cultural expectations—that is, framing rules and feeling rules—regarding how individuals should act and feel. These cultural expectations also influence the degree to which people behave morally. We test these assumptions on a sample of more than 350 university students. We investigate whether the moral identity and framing situations in moral terms influences behavior and feelings. Findings reveal that the identity process and framing of situations as moral are significantly associated with moral action and moral emotions of guilt and shame.
  • Sverdlik, N., et al. (2012). “Morality across cultures: A values perspective.” 219-235.
  • Taefi, A., et al. (2012). “Customers’ Views”: Youth Deviance and its Prevention Seen Through Adolescents’ Eyes – Findings from a European Study. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Taylor, K., et al. (2012). “A Longitudinal Path Analysis of Peer Victimization, Threat Appraisals to the Self, and Aggression, Anxiety, and Depression Among Urban African American Adolescents.” Journal of Youth and Adolescence 42(2): 178-189.
  • Tsutsui, K., et al. (2012). “International Human Rights Law and Social Movements: States’ Resistance and Civil Society’s Insistence.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 8(1): 367-396.
  • Van Ours, J. C. (2012). “The long and winding road to cannabis legalization.” Addiction 107(5): 872-873.
  • Vanfraechem, I. (2012). “Book review: The new faces of victimhood: Globalization, transnational crimes and victim rights.” International Review of Victimology 18(3): 285-286.
  • Vettenburg, N., et al. (2012). Important Differences Between Multiple Offenders and Non-Multiple Offenders. 12th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Bilbao.
  • Wikstrom, P.-O., et al. (2012). Breaking rules. the social and situational dynamics of young people’s urban crime, Oxford.
  • Zatz, M. S. and H. Smith (2012). “Immigration, Crime, and Victimization: Rhetoric and Reality.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 8(1): 141-159.

2011

(Aas 2011, Alter 2011, Arsovska 2011, Berggren and Bjørnskov 2011, Boduszek, Hyland et al. 2011, Boduszek and Hyland_ 2011, Bosworth 2011, Botchkovar, Marshall et al. 2011, Botchkovar, Marshall et al. 2011, Bovenkerk 2011, Brants 2011, Bwoling 2011, Cavadino and Dignan 2011, Cohen and Vauchez 2011, Crawford 2011, Dakil, Cox et al. 2011, Devers 2011, Dimitrijevic 2011, Enzmann 2011, Felson 2011, Friedrichs 2011, Gatti, Haymoz et al. 2011, Gatti, Rocca et al. 2011, Gavray, Vettenburg et al. 2011, Graham, Nosek A. et al. 2011, Haggerty, Wilson et al. 2011, Hallsworth and Lea 2011, Hamby, Finkelhor et al. 2011, Hammersley 2011, He and Marshall 2011, He and Marshall 2011, He and Marshall 2011, Hernandez 2011, Joutsen 2011, Kangaspunta 2011, Karenian, Livaditis et al. 2011, Khamis 2011, Kivivuori 2011, Lacey 2011, Lappi-Seppala and Tonry 2011, Loughran and Mulvey 2011, Lucia and Killias 2011, Lucia and Killias 2011, Lucia and Killias 2011, MacCoun 2011, Maddan, Miller et al. 2011, Manzoni 2011, Marshall and Enzmann 2011, Marshall and Enzmann 2011, Marshall and Enzmann 2011, Marshall, Enzmann et al. 2011, Marshall, Enzmann et al. 2011, Marshall, Gartsman et al. 2011, McGloin, Sullivan et al. 2011, Morillo, Birkbeck et al. 2011, Mosher 2011, Natarajan 2011, Nelken 2011, Neuilly 2011, Nikulina, Widom et al. 2011, Nivette 2011, Nivette 2011, Parti and Virág 2011, Pauwels, Vettenburg et al. 2011, Podaná 2011, Ralph 2011, Ren, Zhao et al. 2011, Ren, Zhao et al. 2011, Ren, Zhao et al. 2011, Ristea 2011, Rocque, Posick et al. 2011, Rodrigues 2011, Sárik 2011, Sárik 2011, Shelley 2011, Sherman 2011, Steketee 2011, Steketee 2011, Steketee 2011, Steketee 2011, Steketee, Marshall et al. 2011, Steketee, Marshall et al. 2011, Sullum 2011, Swaaningen 2011, UNICEF 2011, Valverde 2011, Vaughn, DeLisi et al. 2011, Vettenburg 2011, Vettenburg, Brondeel et al. 2011, Virág and Parti 2011, Webb, Ren et al. 2011, Willman and Makisaka 2011, Wilson 2011, Yun and Walsh 2011)

  • Aas, K. F. (2011). “‘Crimmigrant’ bodies and bona fide travelers: Surveillance, citizenship and global governance.” Theoretical Criminology 15(3): 331-346.
  • Alter, K. J. (2011). “The Evolving International Judiciary.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 7(1): 387-415.
  • Arsovska, J. (2011). Conceptualizing and studying organized crime in a global context. Possible? Indispensable? Superfluous? The Routledge Handbook of International Criminology. C. J. Smith, S. X. Zhang and R. Barberet, Cambridge.
  • Berggren, N. and C. Bjørnskov (2011). “Is the importance of religion in daily life related to social trust? Cross-country and cross-state comparisons.” Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization 80(3): 459-480.
  • Boduszek, D., et al. (2011). “The Theoretical Model of Criminal Social Identity: Psycho-social
  • International Journal of Criminology and Sociological Theory
  • The New Yorker 4(1): 604-615.
  • Boduszek, D. and P. Hyland_ (2011). “The Theoretical Model of Criminal Social Identity: Psycho-social
  • International Journal of Criminology and Sociological Theory
  • The New Yorker 4(1): 604-615.
  • Bosworth, M. (2011). “Penal moderation in the United States?” Criminology & Public Policy 10(2): 335-343.
  • Botchkovar, E., et al. (2011). Risky lifestyles, criminal propensity, and deviance in a cross-national study of youth. 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Washington, DC, American Society of Criminology.
  • Botchkovar, E., et al. (2011). Risky Lifestyles, Criminal Propensity, and Deviance in a Cross-National Study of Youth. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Washington, D.C.
  • Bovenkerk, F. (2011). De opmerkelijke lage jeugddelinquentie in Suriname. Conference of the Nationaal Jeugd Instituut. Amsterdam.
  • Brants, C. (2011). Universal crimes, universal justice? the legitimacy of the international response to genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. International and comparative criminal justice and urban governance. Convergence and divergence in global, national and local settings. Crawford, Cambridge.
  • Bwoling, B. (2011). Transnational criminology and the globalization of harm production. What is Criminology? Bosworth and C. Hoyle. Oxford, UK, Oxford University Press: 361-379.
  • Cavadino, M. and J. Dignan (2011). Penal comparisons: puzzling relations. International and comparative criminal justice and urban governance. A. Crawford, Cambridge University Press.
  • Cohen, A. and A. Vauchez (2011). “The Social Construction of Law: The European Court of Justice and Its Legal Revolution Revisited.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 7(1): 417-431.
  • Crawford, A. (2011). International and comparative criminal justice and urban governance. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
  • Dakil, S. R., et al. (2011). “Racial and ethnic disparities in physical abuse reporting and child protective services interventions in the United States.” Journal of the National Medical Association 103(9-10): 926-931.
  • Devers, L. (2011). Desistance and developmental life course theories. Research Summary. Arlington, VA.
  • Dimitrijevic, J. (2011). Gender and Juvenile Delinquency: The Results of Self-Reported Delinquency Study In Belgrade. 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius.
  • Enzmann, D. (2011). Self-Reported Delinquency of Youths: Social Reactions to Offending. 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius.
  • Felson, M. (2011). Routine activities and transnational crime. International crime and justice. M. Natarajan, Cambrdige.
  • Friedrichs, D. O. (2011). Comparative criminology and global criminology as complementary projects. Comparative Criminal Justice and Globalization. D. Nelken. Farnham, UK, Ashgate: 163-182.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2011). “Deviant Youth Groups in 30 Countries: Results from the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study.” International Criminal Justice Review 21(3): 208-224.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2011). Effects of Delinquency on Alcohol Use Among Juveniles in Europe: Results from the ISRD-2 Study. 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius.
  • Gavray, C., et al. (2011). Societal Vulnerability and Self-Control: Do Violent Values Mediate this Relation for Boys and Girls? 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius.
  • Graham, J., et al. (2011). “Mapping the moral domain.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 101(2): 366-385.
  • Haggerty, K. D., et al. (2011). “Theorizing surveillance in crime control.” Theoretical Criminology 15(3): 231-237.
  • Surveillance is conventionally perceived as a key component of the crime control apparatus. This editors’ introduction to a Special Issue of Theoretical Criminology on ‘Theorizing Surveillance in Crime Control’ outlines both the need for new theorizing on surveillance and some of the difficulties in doing so. It also introduces the seven pieces in the Special Issue.
  • Hallsworth, S. and J. Lea (2011). “Reconstructing Leviathan: Emerging contours of the security state.” Theoretical Criminology 15(2): 141-157.
  • This article develops an account of the current emergence of the security state as successor to the liberal welfare state. It is argued that the security state heralds a new type of authoritarianism which, beginning at the periphery and pre-occupied with the management of the marginalized and socially excluded, is gradually infecting the core social institutions, the criminal justice system in particular. The article considers three areas in which the security state is emerging—the transition from welfare to workfare and risk management; new measures to combat terrorism and organized crime; and the blurring of warfare and crime control. The article concludes by stressing the mutually reinforcing effect of these developments.
  • Hamby, S., et al. (2011). “Children’s Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence and Other Family Violence.” Juvenile Justice Bulletin October 2011.
  • Hammersley, R. (2011). “Pathways through drugs and crime: Desistance, trauma and resilience.” Journal of Criminal Justice 39(3): 268-272.
  • He, N. and I. H. Marshall (2011). The International Self-Report Delinquency (ISRD) Study. International Criminal Justice. M. Natarajan. New York, Cambridge University Press: 478-485.
  • He, N. and I. H. Marshall (2011). The international self-report delinquency study. International Crime and Justice. New York, NY, Cambridge University Press: 478-485.
  • He, N. and I. H. Marshall (2011). The International Self-Report Study of Delinquency study (ISRD). International Crime and Justice. M. Natarajan. New York, NY, Cambridge University Press: 478-485.
  • Hernandez, Z. (2011). Testing social control and self-control theories: Juvenile risky behaviors in Hangzhou, China, Sam Houston State University.
  • Joutsen, M. (2011). The impact of United Nations crime conventions on international cooperation. Routledge Handbook of International Criminology. C. J. Smith, S. X. Zhang and E. Barberet. New York, Routledge: 112-124.
  • Kangaspunta, K. (2011). Trafficking in persons. The Routledge Handbook of International Criminology. C. J. Smith, S. X. Zhang and E. Barberet, Routledge.
  • Karenian, H., et al. (2011). “COLLECTIVE TRAUMA TRANSMISSION AND TRAUMATIC REACTIONS AMONG DESCENDANTS OF ARMENIAN REFUGEES.” The International Journal of Social Psychiatry 57(4): 327.
  • Karenian et al investigate the psychological impact on contemporary Armenians of traumatic events suffered by Armenians during the period 1914-1918. Results show that over a third (35.7%) of participants presented at least sub-clinical forms of such reactions during long periods of their lives. Women, older people, participants with a close relative lost during the events and those with strong connections to the Armenian community were more vulnerable. The results are indicative of a long-lasting (though gradually fading) cross-generational traumatizing effect of the discussed events. Clinicians having to deal with patients belonging to cultural or ethnic groups that suffered persecutions in the past should take into account the probable effects caused by a trauma-transmission mechanism.
  • Khamis, H. (2011). The Association Graph and the Multigraph for Loglinear Models. Thousand Oaks, California.
  • Kivivuori, J. (2011). Discovery of hidden crime: self-report delinquency surveys in criminal policy context.
  • Lacey, N. (2011). Why globalisation doesn’t spell convergence: models of institutional variation and the comparative political economy of punishment. International and comparative criminal justice and urban governance. A. Crawford, Cambridge Unviersity.
  • Lappi-Seppala, T. and M. Tonry (2011). “Crime, Criminal Justice, and Criminology in the Nordic Countries.” Crime and Justice 40: 1-32.
  • Loughran, T. A. and E. P. Mulvey (2011). Estimating Treatment Effects: Matching Quantification to the Question. Handbook of Quantitative Criminology. A. R. Piquero and D. Weisburd. New York, Springer: 163-180.
  • Lucia, S. and M. Killias (2011). “Gewalt und belastende Kindheitserlebnisse: Neue aspekte anhand der Internationalen Self-Report-Studie (ISRD-2).” 5: 36-43 %J Trauma und Gewalt.
  • Lucia, S. and M. Killias (2011). “Is Animal Cruelty a Marker of Interpersonal Violence and Delinquency? Results of a Swiss National Self-Report Study.” Psychology of Violence 1(2): 93-105.
  • Lucia, S. and M. Killias (2011). The School and Its Impact on Delinquency. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Washington, D.C.
  • MacCoun, R. J. (2011). “What can we learn from the Dutch cannabis coffeeshop system?” Addiction 106(11): 1899-1910.
  • AIMS: To examine the empirical consequences of officially tolerated retail sales of cannabis in the Netherlands, and possible implications for the legalization debate. METHODS: Available Dutch data on the prevalence and patterns of use, treatment, sanctioning, prices and purity for cannabis dating back to the 1970s are compared to similar indicators in Europe and the United States. RESULTS: The available evidence suggests that the prevalence of cannabis use among Dutch citizens rose and fell as the number of coffeeshops increased and later declined, but only modestly. The coffeeshops do not appear to encourage escalation into heavier use or lengthier using careers, although treatment rates for cannabis are higher than elsewhere in Europe. Scatterplot analyses suggest that Dutch patterns of use are very typical for Europe, and that the ‘separation of markets’ may indeed have somewhat weakened the link between cannabis use and the use of cocaine or amphetamines. CONCLUSIONS: Cannabis consumption in the Netherlands is lower than would be expected in an unrestricted market, perhaps because cannabis prices have remained high due to production-level prohibitions. The Dutch system serves as a nuanced alternative to both full prohibition and full legalization.
  • Maddan, S., et al. (2011). “Utilizing Criminal History Information to Explore the Effect of Community Notification on Sex Offender Recidivism.” Justice Quarterly 28(2): 303-324.
  • Manzoni, P. (2011). International Schülerbefragung zu Jugend und Kriminalität / Österreich im internationalen Vergleich: Schüler/innen und ihre Gewalterfahrungen. Präventionsfachtagung des Kuratoriums für Verkehrssicherheit. Vienna.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. Enzmann (2011). City-Level Analysis of ISRD-2 Data: Implications for Theory and Methodology. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Washington, D.C.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. Enzmann (2011). City-level analysis of ISRD-2 data: Implications for theory and methodology. 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Washington, DC, American Society of Criminology.
  • Marshall, I. H. and D. Enzmann (2011). Tricky Business: Units of Analysis in Comparative Research. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Chicago, IL.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2011). The International Self-Report Study of Delinquency-2 (ISRD-2): Main findings. 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Washington, DC, American Society of Criminology.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2011). The International Self-Report Study of Delinquency-2 (ISRD-2): Main Findings. Poster presentation. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Washington, D.C.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2011). Immigration and Delinquency, Victimization and Substance Use in International Perspective. 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius.
  • McGloin, J. M., et al. (2011). “Marriage and offending specialization: Expanding the impact of turning points and the process of desistance.” European Journal of Criminology 8(5): 361–376.
  • Morillo, S., et al. (2011). “Autocontrol y conducta desviada: Una exploración con datos Venezolanos.” Revista Cenipec 30: 171-203.
  • Mosher, C. J. (2011). The mismeasure of crime. T. D. Miethe and T. C. Hart. Los Angeles, Calif.
  • London, Los Angeles, Calif.
  • London : SAGE.
  • ‘The Mismeasure of Crime’ addresses the measurement of crime both historically and cross-nationally. It examines the strengths and weaknesses of each data source, the fundamental issues surrounding their accuracy, and the applications of these data in theoretical and policy research.
  • Natarajan, M., Ed. (2011). International Crime and Justice. New York, Cambridge University Press.
  • Nelken, N., Ed. (2011). Comparative Criminal Justice and Globalization. Farnham. UK, Ashgate.
  • Neuilly, M.-A. (2011). “Impact of Medico-Legal Practices on Mortality Statistics and Their Use in Comparative Research.” Victims & Offenders 6: 306-320.
  • Nikulina, V., et al. (2011). “The Role of Childhood Neglect and Childhood Poverty in Predicting Mental Health, Academic Achievement and Crime in Adulthood.” American Journal of Community Psychology 48(3-4): 309-321.
  • Nivette, A. E. (2011). “Cross-National Predictors of Crime: A Meta-Analysis.” Homicide Studies 15: 103-131.
  • Nivette, A. E. (2011). “Old theories and new approaches: Evaluating Freda Adler’s theory of low crime and its implications for criminology.” Theoretical Criminology 15(1): 83-99.
  • Many years ago, Freda Adler (1983) sought to explain the full variation of crime rates through the notion of synnomie. Although Adler’s research was incomplete and somewhat flawed, it drew attention to low crime societies as the subject of criminological research. In this article I critically revisit Adler’s ideas in order to encourage a more methodologically rigorous approach to researching low crime societies. The main issues this article addresses are the assumption of ‘low’ crime and the meaning this label entails, the implications of ‘norm cohesion’ and the need for an alternative approach when studying ‘low’ crime. I conclude with implications for criminological research in the hope that this will invite future inquiry into matters that lie outside the traditional criminological gaze.
  • Parti, K. and G. Virág (2011). “A szájbergyerek és a bicikli. A Kelet-európai gyerekek nethasználatának specifikumai.” Kriminológiai Tanulmányok 48: 29-49.
  • Pauwels, L. J. R., et al. (2011). “Societal Vulnerability and Troublesome Youth Group Involvement : The Mediating Role of Violent Values and Low Self-Control.” International Criminal Justice Review 21(3): 283-296.
  • Podaná, Z. (2011). Fenomén delikvence mládeže v České republice a středoevropském regionu. Praha, Národohospodářský ústav Josefa Hlávky.
  • Ralph, J. (2011). The international criminal court and the state of the american exception. International and comparative criminal justice and urban governance: Convergence and divergence in global, national, and local settings. A. Crawford, Cambridge.
  • Ren, L., et al. (2011). A comparative study of self-reported juvenile victimization in China and the United States. 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Washington, DC, American Society of Criminology.
  • Ren, L., et al. (2011). Confidence in the Police among Adolescents in China. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. Washington, D.C.
  • Ren, L., et al. (2011). A Comparative Study of Self-Reported Juvenile Victimization in China and the United States. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. Washington, D.C.
  • Ristea, I. (2011). “global accounts of the wrongfulness of criminal behavior.” Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice 3(1): 110-115.
  • Rocque, M., et al. (2011). Assessing the correlates of specialization of serious offending in an international sample. 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Washington, DC, American Society of Criminology.
  • Rodrigues, C. D. (2011). Brazil. The State of Criminology. Routledge Handbook of International Criminology. C. J. Smith, S. X. Zhang and R. Barberet. London and New York, Routledge: 313-323.
  • Sárik, E. (2011). The Importance of Values Among Juveniles in Hungary. 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius.
  • Sárik, E. (2011). ISRD2 in Hungary. EUCPN Seminar organized within the framework of the project “Good Practices of Community Conflict Management in the Central European Region” (GPCCM-REG). Budapest.
  • Shelley, L. (2011). The globalization of crime. International Crime and Justice. M. Natarajan. New York, Cambridge.
  • Sherman, L. (2011). An Introduction to Experimental Criminology. Handbook of Quantitative Criminology. S. R. Piquero and D. Weisburg. New York, Springer: 399-436.
  • Steketee, M. (2011). Enviromental prevention of alcohol use among juveniles. Annual Conference of the European Society of Prevention Research. Lisbon.
  • Steketee, M. (2011). The influence of lifestyle of juveniles on their alcohol use. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. Washington, D.C.
  • Steketee, M. (2011). The influence of neighbourhood on alcohol use of juveniles. Annual Conference of the Society of Prevention Research. Washington, D.C.
  • Steketee, M. (2011). Leisure, Peers and Delinquency. 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius.
  • Steketee, M., et al. (2011). Immigration and delinquency, victimization and substance use in international perspective: The importance of disaggregation of immigrant groups. 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Washington, DC, American Society of Criminology.
  • Steketee, M., et al. (2011). Immigration and Delinquency, Victimization and Substance Use in International Perspective: The Importance of Disaggregation of Immigrant Groups. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. Washington, D.C.
  • Sullum, J. (2011). “Bummer.” Reason 43(5): 1-14.
  • Swaaningen, R. V. (2011). Critical cosmopolitanism and global criminology. Comparative Criminal Justice and Globalization. D. Nelken. Farnham, UK, Ashgate: 125-144.
  • UNICEF (2011). “Nordic Study on Child Rights to Participate 2009–2010.” UNICEF: Innolink Research.
  • Valverde, M. (2011). “Questions of security: A framework for research.” Theoretical Criminology 15(1): 3-22.
  • Vaughn, M. G., et al. (2011). “The severe 5%: A latent class analysis of the externalizing spectrum in the United States.” Journal of Criminal Justice 39: 75 – 80.
  • Vettenburg, N. (2011). The Youth Monitor and Self-Reported Juvenile Delinquency in Flanders (Belgium). 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius.
  • Vettenburg, N., et al. (2011). What Mechanisms Cause Societally Vulnerable Young People to Commit Delinquent Behaviour? 11th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Vilnius.
  • Virág, G. and K. Parti (2011). “Sweet Child in Time: Online Sexual Abuse of Children – A Research Exploration.” The Open Criminology Journal 4: 71-90.
  • Webb, V. J., et al. (2011). “A comparative study of youth gangs in China and the United States: Definition, offending, and victimization.” 21: 225-242 %J International Criminal Justice Review.
  • Willman, A. M. and M. Makisaka (2011). Interpersonal Violence Prevention: A Review of the Evidence and Emerging Lessons. World Development Report Background papers. Washington DC, World Bank.
  • Wilson, E. (2011). “Criminogenic Cyber-Capitalism: Paul Virilio, Simulation, and the Global Financial Crisis.” Critical Criminology 20(3): 249-274.
  • Yun, I. and A. Walsh (2011). “The Stability of Self-Control Among South Korean Adolescents.” International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 55(3): 445-459.
  • Gottfredson and Hirschi’s general theory of crime has been widely tested. Yet one of their key hypotheses—the stability of self-control—has received little attention from researchers, and no known study has examined the applicability of the stability hypothesis in a non-Western context. Given Gottfredson and Hirschi’s claim that their low self-control theory transcends cultural and national boundaries, we tested the hypothesis with a nationally representative sample of South Korean adolescents using 5-year panel data. Consistent with studies conducted in the United States, our results offer partial support for Gottfredson and Hirschi’s stability hypothesis. We also provide comparative interpretations of our findings in the South Korean context.

2010

(2010, ? 2010, Abend 2010, Agnew 2010, Alexander 2010, Alleyne and Wood 2010, Bader and Finke 2010, Bank 2010, Bantman 2010, Bernard, snipes et al. 2010, Birkbeck, Morillo et al. 2010, Black, Sussman et al. 2010, Blaya 2010, Blaya and Gatti 2010, Boekhout van Solinge, Wouters et al. 2010, Bolyky, Gyory et al. 2010, Boudon 2010, Boutwell and Beaver 2010, Bovenkerk 2010, Bovenkerk and Wolf 2010, Boyle and Corl 2010, Breen, Manning et al. 2010, Budimlić, Maljević et al. 2010, Burianek 2010, Burianek and Podana 2010, Campesi 2010, Christie 2010, Collins 2010, Czabański, Gruszczyńska et al. 2010, De Giorgi 2010, Deklava and Razpotnik 2010, Eaton, Brener et al. 2010, Egli, Vettenburg et al. 2010, Enders 2010, Enzmann 2010, Enzmann 2010, Enzmann 2010, Enzmann, Haen Marshall et al. 2010, Enzmann, Marshall et al. 2010, Enzmann and Podana 2010, Findlay 2010, Firat and McPherson 2010, Frank, Camp et al. 2010, Frerichs and Münch 2010, Gabuzyan, Margaryan et al. 2010, Gatti 2010, Gatti 2010, Gatti and Fossa 2010, Gatti, Fossa et al. 2010, Gatti, Traverso et al. 2010, Gatti and Verde 2010, Gavray and Vettenburg 2010, Gershoff 2010, Gualco, Ruocco et al. 2010, Hanson, Sawyer et al. 2010, Haymoz and Gatti 2010, Hegtvedt and Scheuerman 2010, Heimer 2010, Hitlin and Vaisey 2010, Hochstetler, DeLisi et al. 2010, Hornberger 2010, Howell 2010, Jackall 2010, Jahic and Mitrani 2010, Junger-Tas 2010, Junger-Tas 2010, Junger-Tas, Haen Marshall et al. 2010, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2010, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2010, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2010, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2010, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2010, Junger-Tas, Marshall et al. 2010, Junger-Tas, Steketee et al. 2010, Justickaja, Kalpokas et al. 2010, Kapardis 2010, Kerezsi, Bolyky et al. 2010, Killias, Aebi et al. 2010, Killias and Lucia 2010, Killias and Lucia 2010, Killias, Maljević et al. 2010, Klasen, Oettingen et al. 2010, Konnov, Makarov et al. 2010, Krohn, Thornberry et al. 2010, Kroneberg, Heinze et al. 2010, Kunst, Winkel et al. 2010, Lansford, Alampay et al. 2010, Lovat, Toomey et al. 2010, Lowe 2010, Lucia, Egli et al. 2010, Lucia and Killias 2010, Lukes 2010, Margaryan and Gabuzyan 2010, Markina 2010, Markina 2010, Markina 2010, Markina and Saar 2010, Marshall, Marshall et al. 2010, Marshall, Marshall et al. 2010, Marshall 2010, Marshall and He 2010, Marshall and He 2010, Marshall, He et al. 2010, Marshall, He et al. 2010, Marshall, Posick et al. 2010, Marshall, Posick et al. 2010, Marshall, Ren et al. 2010, Mendes and Carvalho 2010, Moravcova 2010, Nelken 2010, Organization 2010, Ouimet 2010, Pakes 2010, Paternoster and Bachman 2010, Podaná and Buriánek 2010, Pring 2010, Puniskis 2010, Rawls 2010, Rebellon, Piquero et al. 2010, Rechea Alberola and Bartolomé Gutiérrez 2010, Ren, Webb et al. 2010, Ren, Webb et al. 2010, Reuter 2010, Ring and Andersson 2010, Roth 2010, Salmi and Kivivuori 2010, Sarik 2010, Sarik 2010, Savelsberg 2010, Savoie 2010, Sethi, Huges et al. 2010, Shearing and Johnston 2010, Shelley 2010, Snacken 2010, Sorensen and Gabrielsen 2010, Steketee 2010, Steketee 2010, Steketee 2010, Steketee 2010, Steketee and Gruszczyńska 2010, Steketee and Jonkman 2010, Stets 2010, Stummvoll, Kromer et al. 2010, Svensson and Oberwittler 2010, Torfason and Ingram 2010, Turowetz and Maynard 2010, UNODC 2010, Vettenburg, Gavray et al. 2010, Vettenburg, Pauwels et al. 2010, Wikström 2010, Wikstrom 2010, Wood and Alleyne 2010, xd, Rcher et al. 2010)

  • (2010). Criminology and Public Policy : Putting Theory to Work. Philadelphia, PA, USA, Temple University Press.
  • ?, K. (2010). Õpilaste elustiili ja käitumisharjumuste rahvusvaheline uuring ISRD-2.
  • Abend, G. (2010). What’s New and What’s Old about the New Sociology of Morality. Handbook of the Sociology of Morality. S. Hitlin and S. Vaisey, Springer: 561-584.
  • Agnew, R. (2010). “A general strain theory of terrorism.” Theoretical Criminology 14(2): 131-153.
  • Alexander, M. (2010). The new Jim Crow : mass incarceration in the age of colorblindness. New York : [Jackson, Tenn.], New York : New Press
  • Jackson, Tenn. : Distributed by Perseus Distribution.
  • “As the United States celebrates the nation’s “triumph over race” with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status – much like their grandparents before them.” “In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community – and all of us – to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.”–BOOK JACKET.
  • Alleyne, E. and J. L. Wood (2010). “Gang involvement: psychological and behavioral characteristics of gang members, peripheral youth, and nongang youth.” Aggress Behav 36(6): 423-436.
  • Research has noted the existence of a loose and dynamic gang structure. However, the psychological processes that underpin gang membership have only begun to be addressed. This study examined gang members, peripheral youth, and nongang youth across measures of criminal activity, the importance they attach to status, their levels of moral disengagement, their perceptions of out-group threat, and their attitudes toward authority. Of the 798 high school students who participated in this study, 59 were identified as gang members, 75 as peripheral youth, and 664 as nongang youth. Gang members and peripheral youth were more delinquent than nongang youth overall; however, gang members committed more minor offenses than nongang youth and peripheral youth committed more violent offenses than nongang youth. Gang members were more anti-authority than nongang youth, and both gang and peripheral youth valued social status more than nongang youth. Gang members were also more likely to blame their victims for their actions and use euphemisms to sanitize their behavior than nongang youth, whereas peripheral youth were more likely than nongang youth to displace responsibility onto their superiors. These findings are discussed as they highlight the importance of examining individual differences in the cognitive processes that relate to gang involvement.
  • Bader, C. D. and R. Finke (2010). What Does God Require? Understanding Religious Context and Morality: 241-254.
  • Bank, W. (2010). Violence in the city. Understanding and supporting Community Responses to Urban Violence. Washington D.C.
  • Bantman, C. (2010). “Book Review: Paul Knepper, The Invention of International Crime: A Global Issue in the Making 1881—1914, Palgrave Macmillan: Basingstoke, 2009; 254 pp.: 9780230238183.” Theoretical Criminology 14(4): 540-542.
  • Bernard, T. J., et al. (2010). Vold’s Theoretical Criminology, Oxford University Press.
  • Birkbeck, C., et al. (2010). Venezuela. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 385-398.
  • Black, D. S., et al. (2010). “A further look at the intergenerational transmission of violence: witnessing interparental violence in emerging adulthood.” J Interpers Violence 25(6): 1022-1042.
  • The intergenerational transmission (IGT) of violence has been a main the oretical consideration to explain the link between interparental aggression in the family of origin and intimate partner violence (IPV) in subsequent intimate relationships. Studies have examined this theoretical link based on self reports of interparental violence witnessed during childhood and adolescence. However, no study has examined whether emerging adults who currently witness interparental violence are more likely to exhibit violence in their own intimate relationships. Data were analyzed from undergraduate students (N = 223) attending an ethnically diverse Southern California uni versity. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to examine the impact of witnessing interparental violence on the physical and psycho logical IPV experienced in emerging adult relationships. The joint effects of witnessing both forms of interparental violence were also tested. Support for the intergenerational transmission of violence was identified for specific types of violence. Future directions of study and implications for prevention and treatment are offered.
  • Blaya, C. (2010). France. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 65-77.
  • Blaya, C. and U. Gatti (2010). “Deviant Youth Groups in Italy and France: Prevalence and Characteristics.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 16(2): 127-144.
  • Boekhout van Solinge, T., et al. (2010). The Netherlands Antilles and Aruba. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 409-422.
  • Bolyky, O., et al. (2010). Hungary. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 311-325.
  • Boudon, R. (2010). The Cognitive Approach to Morality: 15-33.
  • Boutwell, B. B. and K. M. Beaver (2010). “The Intergenerational Transmission of Low Self-control.” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 47(2): 174-209.
  • Bovenkerk, F. (2010). Surinam. ?
  • Bovenkerk, F. and T. Wolf (2010). Surinam. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 399-407.
  • Boyle, E. H. and A. C. Corl (2010). “Law and Culture in a Global Context: Interventions to Eradicate Female Genital Cutting.” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 6(1): 195-215.
  • Breen, J., et al. (2010). Ireland. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 113-123.
  • Budimlić, M., et al. (2010). Bosnia-Herzegovina. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 341-358.
  • Burianek, J. (2010). Alcohol abuse, self-control and juvenile delinquency. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Burianek, J. and Z. Podana (2010). Czech Republic. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 293-309.
  • Campesi, G. (2010). “Policing, urban poverty and insecurity in Latin America: The case of Mexico City and Buenos Aires.” Theoretical Criminology 14(4): 447-471.
  • This article explains how, in the late 20th century, Latin America went through a transition in social-control policy that followed and paralleled the area’s transition from a pervasively authoritarian polity to a democratic one bearing a strong neoliberal imprint. Social-control strategies initially designed to serve a national-security doctrine mainly directed against political opponents morphed into strategies for the repressive government of the advanced marginal groups that for the most part live within economically deprived urban areas. The focus here will be on Buenos Aires and Mexico City. These two cases will be used to exemplify the way in which crime and public security in the Latin American megalopolis have become an important part of the political agenda and how the fears and concerns so amplified have stimulated strong neo-authoritarian pressures that in certain ways have stifled police-democratization processes which had got under way in both Argentina and Mexico in the last decade of the 20th century.
  • Christie, N. (2010). “Victim movements at a crossroad.” Punishment & Society 12(2): 115-122.
  • Collins, P. H. (2010). “The New Politics of Community.” American Sociological Review 75(1): 7-30.
  • Czabański, J., et al. (2010). Poland. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, C. E. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 279-292.
  • De Giorgi, A. (2010). “Immigration control, post-Fordism, and less eligibility: A materialist critique of the criminalization of immigration across Europe.” Punishment & Society 12(2): 147-167.
  • Deklava, B. and S. Razpotnik (2010). Slovenia. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 327-340.
  • Eaton, D. K., et al. (2010). “Comparison of paper-and-pencil versus web administration of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS): Risk behavior prevalence estimates.” Evaluation Research 343: 137 – 153.
  • Egli, N., et al. (2010). “Belgium, Canada and Switzerland: Are There Differences in the Contributions of Selected Variables on Self-Reported Property-Related and Violent Delinquency?” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 16(3): 145-166.
  • Enders, C. K. (2010). Applied missing data analysis. New York, Guilford Press.
  • Enzmann, D. (2010). Germany. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 47-64.
  • Enzmann, D. (2010). Reporting of victimization experiences and social responses to offending: Cross-national comparisons. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Enzmann, D. (2010). Self-Control, Self-Reported Delinquency and the Human Development Index: A Cross-National Comparison. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Enzmann, D., et al. (2010). “Self-reported youth delinquency in Europe and beyond: First results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study in the context of police and victimization data.” 7: 159-183 %J European Journal of Criminology.
  • Enzmann, D., et al. (2010). “Self-reported youth delinquency in Europe and beyond: First results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study in the context of police and victimization data.” European Journal of Criminology 7: 159-183.
  • Enzmann, D. and Z. Podana (2010). “Official Crime Statistics and Survey Data: Comparing Trends of Youth Violence between 2000 and 2006 in Cities of the Czech Republic, Germany, Poland, Russia, and Slovenia.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 16(3): 191-205.
  • Findlay, M. (2010). Beyond punishment : achieving international criminal justice. Basingstoke
  • New York, Basingstoke
  • New York : Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Firat, R. and C. M. McPherson (2010). Toward an Integrated Science of Morality: 361-384.
  • Frank, D. J., et al. (2010). “Worldwide Trends in the Criminal Regulation of Sex, 1945 to 2005.” American Sociological Review 75(6): 867-893.
  • Frerichs, S. and R. Münch (2010). Morality, Modernity, and World Society: 529-548.
  • Gabuzyan, A., et al. (2010). Problems of the Fight Against Juvenile Crime in the Republic of Armenia. Yerevan, YSU: 1-35.
  • Gatti, U. (2010). Using Mokken Scale Analysis to Develop a Gang Scale: Results from the International Self-Reported Delinquency Study-2 (ISRD-2). 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Gatti, U. (2010). Using Mokken scale analysis to develop a gang scale: Results from the International Self-Reported Delinquency Study-2 (ISRD-2). 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Liege, Belgium, European Society of Criminology.
  • Gatti, U. and G. Fossa (2010). Tra devianza e disagio: comportamenti illeciti e abuso di alcol tra i minorenni in Liguria. Reati registrati e rischi criminali. Quarto rapporto sulla sicurezza urbana in Liguria. S. Padovano. Genova, Brigati: 113-131.
  • Gatti, U., et al. (2010). Italy. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 227-244.
  • Gatti, U., et al., Eds. (2010). La delinquenza giovanile in Italia. I risultati di una ricerca multicentrica. Lecce, Pensa MultiMedia.
  • Gatti, U. and A. Verde (2010). Gang Membership and Alcohol and Drug Use. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Gavray, C. and N. Vettenburg (2010). Vandalism among adolescents – A comparison of European countries. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Gershoff, E. T. (2010). “More harm than good: A summary of scientific research on the intended and unintended effects of corporal punishment on children.” Law and Contemporary Problems 73: 31.
  • Gualco, B., et al. (2010). “Struttura familiare e comportamenti devianti dei giovani in Italia: uno studio effettuato attraverso il metodo del self-report.” Criminologia 4(2): 255-281.
  • Hanson, R. F., et al. (2010). “The impact of crime victimization on quality of life.” Journal of Traumatic Stress 23: 189–197.
  • Haymoz, S. and U. Gatti (2010). “Girl members of deviant youth groups, offending behaviour and victimisation: Results from the ISRD2 in Italy and Switzerland.” 16: 167-182 %J European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.
  • Hegtvedt, K. A. and H. l. Scheuerman (2010). The Justice/Morality Link
  • Implied, then Ignored, yet Inevitable.
  • Heimer, C. A. (2010). The Unstable Alliance of Law and Morality: 179-202.
  • Hitlin, S. and S. Vaisey (2010). Back to the Future. Handbook of the Sociology of Morality. S. Hitlin and S. Vaisey, Springer Science+Business Media: 3-14.
  • Hochstetler, A., et al. (2010). “The Criminal Victimization–Depression Sequela.” Crime & Delinquency 60(5): 785-806.
  • Hornberger, J. (2010). “Human Rights and Policing: Exigency or Incongruence?” Annual Review of Law and Social Science 6(1): 259-283.
  • Howell (2010). “gang prevention.”
  • Jackall, R. (2010). “Morality in Organizations.” 203-209.
  • Jahic, G. and A. T. A. Mitrani (2010). “International Crime Victim Survey 2005: Criminal Victimization in Istanbul Households.” Procedia – Social and Behavioral Sciences: 190-198.
  • Junger-Tas, J. (2010). Neighborhood and Delinquent Behavior. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Junger-Tas, J. (2010). “The significance of the International Self-report Delinquency Study (ISRD).” 16: 71-87 %J European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2010). History and design of the ISRD studies. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. New York, NY, Springer: 1-11.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2010). History and Design of the ISRD Studies.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2010). History and design of the ISRD Studies. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 1-11.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2010). Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. New York, NY, Springer.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al., Eds. (2010). Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. New York, Springer.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2010). Synthesis and Outlook. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 423-427.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2010). Synthesis and Outlook.
  • Junger-Tas, J., et al. (2010). The Netherlands. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 15-28.
  • Justickaja, S., et al. (2010). Lithuania. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 267-278.
  • Kapardis, A. (2010). Cyprus. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 245-251.
  • Kerezsi, K., et al. (2010). Fiatalkori devianciák egy önbevalláson alapuló felmérés tükrében. Iskolai veszélyek. L. Aáry-Tamás and J. Aronson. Budapest, Complex: 157-186.
  • Killias, M., et al. (2010). Switzerland. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 79-95.
  • Killias, M. and S. Lucia (2010). Animal Cruelty: An important marker of serious adult violence? Results from the Swiss ISRD-2 study. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Killias, M. and S. Lucia (2010). Animal cruelty: An important marker of serious adult violence? Results from the Swiss ISRD-2 study. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Liege, Belgium, European Society of Criminology.
  • Killias, M., et al. (2010). “Imported Violence?” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 16(3): 183-189.
  • Klasen, F., et al. (2010). “Multiple trauma and mental health in former Ugandan child soldiers.” Journal of Traumatic Stress 23(5): 573-581.
  • The present study examines the effect of war and domestic violence on the mental health of child soldiers in a sample consisting of 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age: 11–17 years, female: 49%). All children had experienced at least 1 war‐related event and 78% were additionally exposed to at least 1 incident of domestic violence. Prevalences of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder were 33%, and 36%, respectively. Behavioral and emotional problems above clinical cutoff were measured in 61%. No gender differences were found regarding mental health outcomes. War experience and domestic violence were significantly associated with all mental health outcomes. The authors’ findings point to the detrimental effects of domestic violence in addition to traumatizing war experiences in child soldiers.
  • Konnov, A., et al. (2010). Russia. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 359-368.
  • Krohn, M. D., et al. (2010). “The development and impact of self-report measures of crime and delinquency.” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 26(4): 509-525.
  • Kroneberg, C., et al. (2010). “The interplay of moral norms and instrumental incentives in crime causation.” Criminology 48(1): 259-294.
  • Kunst, M. J. J., et al. (2010). “Posttraumatic Growth Moderates the Association Be tween Violent Revictimization and Persisting PTSD Symptoms in Victims of Interpersonal Violence: A Six-Month Follow-Up Study.” Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology 29(5): 527-545.
  • Lansford, J. E., et al. (2010). “Corporal punishment of children in nine countries as a function of child gender and parent gender.” International journal of pediatrics 2010.
  • Lovat, T., et al., Eds. (2010). International Research Handbook on Values Education and Student Wellbeing, Springer.
  • Lowe, B. M. (2010). “The Creation and Establishment of Moral Vocabularies.” 293-312.
  • Lucia, S., et al. (2010). “La violenza giovanile in Italia e Svizzera: diffusione, caratteristiche e contesto dei comportamenti violenti nei due Paesi.” Rassegna Italiana di Criminologia 4(2): 217-236.
  • Lucia, S. and M. Killias (2010). School systems and their effects on delinquency. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Lukes, S. (2010). “The Social Construction of Morality?”: 549-560.
  • Margaryan, A. and A. Gabuzyan (2010). Armenia. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 369-382.
  • Markina, A. (2010). Juvenile substance abuse and gender (based on ISRD-2 data). 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Markina, A. (2010). Juvenile substance abuse and gender (based on ISRD-2 data). 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Liege, Belgium, European Society of Criminology.
  • Markina, A. (2010). Juvenile Substance Use and Gender. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Markina, A. and J. Saar (2010). Estonia. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond: Results of the Second International Self-report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 255-265.
  • Marshall, C., et al. (2010). Who are the ‘bad kids’ in Europe and beyond? Some answers from the ISRD-2. 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, San Francisco, CA, American Society of Criminology.
  • Marshall, C., et al. (2010). Who Are the ‘Bad Kids’ in Europe and Beyond? Some Answers from the ISRD-2. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Marshall, I. H. (2010). “‘Pourquoi pas?’ versus ‘absolutely not!’ Cross-national differences in access to schools and pupils for survey research.” 16: 89-109 %J European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research.
  • Marshall, I. H. and N. He (2010). USA. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 139-157.
  • Marshall, I. H. and N. He (2010). USA.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2010). How Generalizable is Low Self Control Theory? Results from ISRD-2. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2010). How generalizable is low self control theory? Results from ISRD-2. 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, San Francisco, CA, American Society of Criminology.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2010). Self-Control Theory in a Comparative Context: Some Expected and Some Unexpected Findings. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2010). Self-control theory in a comparative context: Some expected and some unexpected findings. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Liege, Belgium, European Society of Criminology.
  • Marshall, I. H., et al. (2010). Self-reported delinquency, victimization, and gang involvement in school-based samples: A China and U.S. comparison. 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology, San Francisco, CA, American Society of Criminology.
  • Mendes, S. M. and S. Carvalho (2010). Portugal. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 205-211.
  • Moravcova, E. (2010). Gangs in the Czech Republic: Additional contemplation of a methodological research tool of Eurogang. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Nelken, D. (2010). Comparative Criminal Justice, Sage.
  • Organization, W. H. (2010). Violence prevention: The evidence. Geneva.
  • Ouimet, M. (2010). “A World of Homicides: The Effect of Economic Development, Income Inequality, and Excess Infant Mortality on the Homicide Rate for 165 Countries in 2010.” Homicide Studies 16: 238-258.
  • Pakes, F. (2010). “The comparative method in globalized criminology.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology 43(1): 17-30.
  • Paternoster, R. and R. Bachman (2010). Control Theories. The Sage Handbook of Criminological Theory. Thousands Oaks, Cal., Sage: 114-138.
  • Podaná, Z. and J. Buriánek (2010). Alcohol Use among Juveniles and Self-Control: Comparison across Europe. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Pring, R. (2010). Preface. International Research Handbook on Values Education and Student Wellbeing. T. Lovat, R. Toomey and N. Clement. New York, Springer: v-vi.
  • Puniskis, M. J. (2010). “Book Review: Katja Franko Aas, Globalization and Crime, SAGE: London, 2007; 232 pp.: 9781412912907,  20.99.” Theoretical Criminology 14(2): 239-241.
  • Rawls, A. W. (2010). “Social Order as Moral Order.” 95-121.
  • Rebellon, C. J., et al. (2010). “Anticipated shaming and criminal offending.” Journal of Criminal Justice 38(5): 988-997.
  • Rechea Alberola, C. and R. Bartolomé Gutiérrez (2010). Spain. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 213-226.
  • Ren, L., et al. (2010). Self-Reported Victimization and Delinquency among 7th, 8th and 9th Grade Students: A China and U.S. Comparison. Annual Meeting of the American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Ren, L., et al. (2010). A Preliminary Effort to Test the Feasibility of Using Self-Report Methodology to Assess Juvenile Delinquency and Misbehavior in Chinese School-based Sample using ISRD-based instrumentation. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Reuter, P. H. (2010). Marijuana legalization. What can be learned from other countries?, Drug Policy Research Center.
  • Ring, J. and L. Andersson (2010). Sweden. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 173-190.
  • Roth, L. T. (2010). “The Moral Construction of Risk.” 469-484.
  • Salmi, V. and J. Kivivuori (2010). Finland. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, C. E. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 161-172.
  • Sarik, E. (2010). ‘Deep impact’: Risk factors of violence offence in Central Europe (ISRD-2: Estonian, Czech, and Hungarian youth comparison study). 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology, Liege, Belgium, European Society of Criminology.
  • Sarik, E. (2010). “Deep impact”: Risk Factors of violence offence in Central Europe (IRSD-2: Estonian, Czech and Hungarian youth comparison study). 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Savelsberg, J. (2010). Crime and Human rights: Criminology of Genocide and Atrocities. Thousand Oaks, Cal., Sage.
  • Savoie, J. (2010). Canada. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, C. E. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 125-137.
  • Sethi, D., et al. (2010). European Report on Preventoing Violence and Knife Crime among Young People, World Health Organization Europe.
  • Abstract
  • This report highlights interpersonal violence as the third leading cause of death and a leading cause of disability among people aged
  • 10–29 years in the 53 countries of the WHO European Region. This burden is unequally distributed, and 9 of 10 homicide deaths in
  • the Region occur in low- and middle-income countries. Irrespective of country income, interpersonal violence disproportionately
  • affects young people from deprived sections of society and males, who comprise 4 of 5 homicide deaths. Numerous biological, social,
  • cultural, economic and environmental factors interact to increase young people’s risk of being involved in violence and knife-related
  • Factors that can protect against violence developing among young people include good social skills, self-esteem, academic
  • achievement, strong bonds with parents, positive peer groups, good attachment to school, community involvement and access to
  • social support. Good evidence indicates that reducing risk factors and enhancing protective factors will reduce violence among young
  • The experience accumulated by several countries in the Region and elsewhere shows that social policy and sustained and
  • systematic approaches that address the underlying causes of violence can make countries in the Region much safer. These make
  • compelling arguments for advocating for increased investment in prevention and for mainstreaming objectives for preventing violence
  • among young people into other areas of health and social policy.
  • Shearing, C. and L. Johnston (2010). “Nodal wars and network fallacies: A genealogical analysis of global insecurities.” Theoretical Criminology 14(4): 495-514.
  • In this article we examine three prominent discourses of security governance and suggest, through a critical review of organizational network theory, that the nodal model can offer theoretical, methodological and ethical benefits over alternative ones. These benefits, we argue, are especially pertinent to the analysis of contemporary global insecurities. The article closes by reflecting on two issues raised in the earlier analysis: how an awareness of discursive contiguity can help inform our understanding of nodal tendencies in global security governance; and how the methodological fallacy of ‘nodal-network equivalence’ plays out under conditions of the ‘war on terror’.
  • Shelley, L. (2010). Human trafficking: A Global Perspective. Cambrdige, Cambrdige University Press.
  • Snacken, S. (2010). “Resisting punitiveness in Europe?” Theoretical Criminology 14(3): 273-292.
  • Sorensen, D. W. M. and N. Gabrielsen (2010). Denmark. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, C. E. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 191-202.
  • Steketee, M. (2010). Alcohol use in Europe and beyond. Annual Conference of the Society of Prevention Research. Denver, CO.
  • Steketee, M. (2010). Anti social behaviour and the influence of neighbourhood. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Steketee, M. (2010). The Lifestyles of Juveniles and Delinquent Behavior in Comparative Context. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Steketee, M. (2010). Substance use of young people and delinquent behaviour. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Steketee, M. and B. Gruszczyńska (2010). “Juvenile Delinquency in Six New EU Member States.” European Journal on Criminal Policy and Research 16(2): 111-125.
  • Steketee, M. and H. Jonkman (2010). Substance Use of Young People and Delinquent Behaviour. Annual Meeting of The American Society of Criminology. San Francisco, CA.
  • Stets, J. E. (2010). “The Social Psychology of the Moral Identity.” 385-409.
  • Stummvoll, G. P., et al. (2010). Austria. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 97-109.
  • Svensson, R. and D. Oberwittler (2010). “It’s not the time they spend, it’s what they do: The interaction between delinquent friends and unstructured routine activity on delinquency.” Journal of Criminal Justice 38(5): 1006-1014.
  • Torfason, M. T. and P. Ingram (2010). “The Global Rise of Democracy: A Network Account.” American Sociological Review 75(3): 355-377.
  • Turowetz, J. J. and D. W. Maynard (2010). “Morality in the Social Interactional and Discursive World of Everyday Life.” 503-526.
  • UNODC (2010). The globalization of crime. A transnational organized crime threat assessment. Vienna, United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.
  • Vettenburg, N., et al. (2010). Belgium. Juvenile Delinquency in Europe and Beyond. Results of the Second International Self-Report Delinquency Study. J. Junger-Tas, I. H. Marshall, D. Enzmann et al. New York, Springer: 29-46.
  • Vettenburg, N., et al. (2010). Social vulnerability and adolescent offending. Exploring the role of violent values, low self-control and troublesome youth group involvement. 10th Annual Conference of the European Society of Criminology. Liège.
  • Wikström, P.-O. H. (2010). “Explaining Crime as Moral Actions.” 211-239.
  • Wikstrom, P. O. (2010). “Situational Action theory.”
  • Wood, J. and E. Alleyne (2010). “Street gang theory and research: Where are we now and where do we go from here?” Aggression and Violent Behavior 15(2): 100-111.
  • xd, et al. (2010). “Turkey: justice delayed is justice denied.” International Union Rights 17(4): 22-23.

1990 – 1999

 

  • Allardt, E. (1990). “Challenges for comparative social research.” Acta Sociologica 33: 183-193.
  • Bennett, R. R. and J. P. Lynch (1990). “Does a Difference Make a Difference? Comparing Cross-National Crime Indicators.” Criminology 28: 153-182.
  • Bennett, R. R. and J. P. Lynch (1990). “Does a difference make a difference? Comparing cross-national crime indicators.” Criminology 28: 153 – 182.
  • Esping-Andersen, G. (1990). The Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism. Princeton, New York, Princeton University Press.
  • Farrington, D. P. and D. J. West (1990). The Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development:
  • A long-term follow-up of 411 London males. Kriminalitat: Personlichkeit, Lebensgeschichte und Verhalten (Criminality:
  • Personality, Behaviour and Life History). H.-J. Kerner and G. Kaiser. Berlin, Germany, Springer-Verlag: (pp.115-138).
  • Gottfredson, M. and T. Hirschi (1990). A General Theory of Crime.
  • Gottfredson, M. and T. Hirschi (1990). A General Theory of Crime. Palo Alto, Cal., Stanford University Press.
  • Horney, J. and I. H. Marshall (1991). “MEASURING LAMBDA THROUGH SELF-REPORTS.” Criminology 29(3): 471-495.
  • Kent, D. and G. Felkenes (1998). Cultural Explanations for Vietnamese Youth Involvement in Street Gangs. U. S. D. o. J. O. o. J. Programs and O. o. J. J. a. D. Prevention.
  • Messner, S. and M. Krohn (1990). “Class, compliance structures and delinquency.” American Journal of Sociology 96: 300 – 328.
  • S. Department of Justice, N. I. o. J. (1990). 1988 Drug use forecasting annual report: Drugs and crime in America. Washington, DC.